WoRMS name details

Favia pallida (Dana, 1846)

207440  (urn:lsid:marinespecies.org:taxname:207440)

 unaccepted (original combination, basionym)
Species
marine, brackish, fresh, terrestrial
Dana, J. D. (1846-1849). Zoophytes. United States Exploring Expedition during the years 1838-1842. Lea and Blanchard, Philadelphia. 7: 1-740, 61 pls. (1846: 1-120, 709-720; 1848: 121-708, 721-740; 1849: atlas pls. 1-61). [details]   
Note Fiji (Veron, 1986).  
From other sources
Type locality Fiji (Veron, 1986). [details]
Description This is the most variable Favia in terms of calice size, though there is a consistency of pattern despite this. Corallites...  
Description This is the most variable Favia in terms of calice size, though there is a consistency of pattern despite this. Corallites range from 5 mm to just over 1 cm in diameter. Mature corallites from stressed areas fall generally at the smaller end of the range, while those on clear water reef slopes are larger. Calices are irregular in shape, and have raised rims. Septa are widely spaced and irregular. They are visibly fewer in number than similar sized F. speciosa. This is a very abundant coral, being the most common of the Favia. It is seen on reef slopes from 5 to 35 m deep, in clear water, exposed outer reefs as well as in more turbid, back reef environments. It is common on reef flats also and can tolerate salinities of up to 48 parts per thousand. It is common also on reef crests where wave action is not extreme (Sheppard, 1998).
Colonies are massive. Corallites are circular, with calices 6-10 mm in diameter. Septa are widely spaced and irregular. Paliform lobes are usually poorly developed. Colour: pale yellow, cream or green, always with dark-brown or green calices. Abundance: the most common faviid and often a dominant of back reef margins (Veron, 1986).
Colonies dome-shaped, similar to F. favus, but corallites are smaller (usually <10 mm across), flatter and irregualrly rounded. Colour: Polyps a pale cream or green with dark brown or green centres. Habitat: diverse reefs areas (Richmond, 1997). [details]
WoRMS (2018). Favia pallida (Dana, 1846). Accessed at: http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=207440 on 2018-02-20
Date
action
by
1997-01-31 16:37:49Z
created
2000-09-28 07:24:50Z
changed
Garcia, Maria
2008-01-16 10:35:54Z
changed
2014-03-16 01:08:52Z
changed
2014-05-27 21:37:37Z
changed

Creative Commons License The webpage text is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License


original description Dana, J. D. (1846-1849). Zoophytes. United States Exploring Expedition during the years 1838-1842. Lea and Blanchard, Philadelphia. 7: 1-740, 61 pls. (1846: 1-120, 709-720; 1848: 121-708, 721-740; 1849: atlas pls. 1-61). [details]   

basis of record Veron, J.E.N. (1986). Corals of Australia and the Indo-Pacific. Angus & Robertson Publishers, London. [details]   

additional source Veron, J.E.N., Pichon, M. & Wijsman-Best, M. 1977. Scleractinia of Eastern Australia – Part II. Families Faviidae, Trachyphylliidae. Australian Institute of Marine Science Monograph series 3: 1–233. [details]   

additional source Cairns, S.D.; Hoeksema, B.W. & van der Land, J. (2007). as a contribution to UNESCO-IOC Register of Marine Organisms. (look up in IMIS[details]   

additional source Liu J.Y. [Ruiyu] (ed.). (2008). Checklist of marine biota of China seas. China Science Press. 1267 pp. (look up in IMIS[details]  Available for editors  PDF available [request] 

additional source Veron JEN. (2000). Corals of the World. Vol. 1–3. Australian Institute of Marine Science and CRR, Queensland, Australia.  [details]   

new combination reference Budd, A.F., Fukami, H., Smith, N.D. & Knowlton, N. 2012. Taxonomic classification of the reef coral family Mussidae (Cnidaria: Anthozoa: Scleractinia. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society 166: 465–529. [details]   

context source (HKRMS) Chan, A. L. K.; Chan, K. K.; Choi, C. L. S.; McCorry, D.; Lee, M. W.; Ang, P. (2005). Field guide to hard corals of Hong Kong. Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department, The Hong Kong SAR Government.  [details]   
 
 Present  Inaccurate  Introduced: alien 
 

From editor or global species database
Biology zooxanthellate [details]

From other sources
Description This is the most variable Favia in terms of calice size, though there is a consistency of pattern despite this. Corallites range from 5 mm to just over 1 cm in diameter. Mature corallites from stressed areas fall generally at the smaller end of the range, while those on clear water reef slopes are larger. Calices are irregular in shape, and have raised rims. Septa are widely spaced and irregular. They are visibly fewer in number than similar sized F. speciosa. This is a very abundant coral, being the most common of the Favia. It is seen on reef slopes from 5 to 35 m deep, in clear water, exposed outer reefs as well as in more turbid, back reef environments. It is common on reef flats also and can tolerate salinities of up to 48 parts per thousand. It is common also on reef crests where wave action is not extreme (Sheppard, 1998).
Colonies are massive. Corallites are circular, with calices 6-10 mm in diameter. Septa are widely spaced and irregular. Paliform lobes are usually poorly developed. Colour: pale yellow, cream or green, always with dark-brown or green calices. Abundance: the most common faviid and often a dominant of back reef margins (Veron, 1986).
Colonies dome-shaped, similar to F. favus, but corallites are smaller (usually <10 mm across), flatter and irregualrly rounded. Colour: Polyps a pale cream or green with dark brown or green centres. Habitat: diverse reefs areas (Richmond, 1997). [details]

Type locality Fiji (Veron, 1986). [details]
 

LanguageName 
English knob coral  [details]
Japanese ウスチャキクメイシ  [details]