WoRMS taxon details

Blastomussa merleti (Wells, 1961)

207385  (urn:lsid:marinespecies.org:taxname:207385)

accepted
Species
marine, fresh, terrestrial
(ofBantamia merleti Wells, 1961) Wells, J.W. 1961. Notes on Indo-Pacific scleractinian corals. Part 3, A new reef coral from New Caledonia. Pacific Science 15: 189-191. [details]   

(ofBlastomussa merletti (Wells, 1961)) Wells, J.W. 1961. Notes on Indo-Pacific scleractinian corals. Part 3, A new reef coral from New Caledonia. Pacific Science 15: 189-191. [details]   

(ofBlastomussa (Blastomussa) merleti (Wells, 1961)) Wells, J.W. 1961. Notes on Indo-Pacific scleractinian corals. Part 3, A new reef coral from New Caledonia. Pacific Science 15: 189-191. [details]   

Wells, J.W. 1961. Notes on Indo-Pacific scleractinian corals. Part 3, A new reef coral from New Caledonia. Pacific Science 15: 189-191. [details]   
Description This is the smallest mussid, but has the typical fleshy polyps of the family. Colonies rarely exceed a diameter of 25-30...  
Description This is the smallest mussid, but has the typical fleshy polyps of the family. Colonies rarely exceed a diameter of 25-30 cm. Calices are 4-9 mm diameter, and septa contain few strong but blunt spines, commonly one on each near the wall. Colonies are cerioid, phaceloid, or with both conditions occurring in the same colony. When the cerioid growth form exists, colonies are low and encrusting. Even here, there may be little or no organic tissue connecting adjacent polyps, and phaceloid corallites usually occur near the perimeter of the colony. Wholly phaceloid growth forms have a greater thickness, with individual corallites reaching 6 cm tall, of which the top 15 mm is enveloped by tissue (see the 3 b/w photos for variation). This species favours small crevices or steep parts of reef slopes. It can be found equally on exposed reef slopes and slightly sedimented areas, and may be recorded down to at least 50 m depth in fairly dark and cryptic conditions as well as in moderately lit areas. It is very rarely encountered in shallow or exposed conditions. The cerioid condition becomes more common in the western Indian Ocean region. (Sheppard, 1998 <308>).
Corallites are less than 7 mm in diameter. Septa are in three cycles, of which only the first two reach the columella. Colour: dark red or greenish-brown (two colour morphs). Abundance: uncommon. (Veron, 1986 <57>)
Always distinctive. Corallites in the colony are widely spaced providing room for the fleshy mantles of the polyp to expand. Colour: mantles red or green with a bright green centre, making the red variety a spectacular find underwater. Habitat: diverse reef areas, but never common. (Richmond, 1997) [details]
Hoeksema, B. W.; Cairns, S. (2018). World List of Scleractinia. Blastomussa merleti (Wells, 1961). Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at: http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=207385 on 2018-09-21
Date
action
by
1997-01-31 16:37:49Z
created
2000-07-18 15:57:33Z
changed
2008-01-16 10:35:54Z
changed
2013-09-08 13:36:39Z
changed

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original description  (ofBantamia merleti Wells, 1961) Wells, J.W. 1961. Notes on Indo-Pacific scleractinian corals. Part 3, A new reef coral from New Caledonia. Pacific Science 15: 189-191. [details]   

original description  (ofBlastomussa merletti (Wells, 1961)) Wells, J.W. 1961. Notes on Indo-Pacific scleractinian corals. Part 3, A new reef coral from New Caledonia. Pacific Science 15: 189-191. [details]   

original description  (ofBlastomussa (Blastomussa) merleti (Wells, 1961)) Wells, J.W. 1961. Notes on Indo-Pacific scleractinian corals. Part 3, A new reef coral from New Caledonia. Pacific Science 15: 189-191. [details]   

original description  (ofCladocora kabiraensis Eguchi, 1975) Eguchi, M. (1975). Notes on coral genera of the Yaeyoma Island group, with description of a new species, Cladocora kabiraensis n. sp. Proceedings of the Japanese Society for Systematic Zoology. 11: 1-4. [details]   

original description Wells, J.W. 1961. Notes on Indo-Pacific scleractinian corals. Part 3, A new reef coral from New Caledonia. Pacific Science 15: 189-191. [details]   

basis of record Veron, J.E.N. (1986). Corals of Australia and the Indo-Pacific. Angus & Robertson Publishers, London. [details]   

additional source Cairns, S.D.; Hoeksema, B.W. & van der Land, J. (2007). as a contribution to UNESCO-IOC Register of Marine Organisms. (look up in IMIS[details]   

additional source Liu J.Y. [Ruiyu] (ed.). (2008). Checklist of marine biota of China seas. China Science Press. 1267 pp. (look up in IMIS[details]  Available for editors  PDF available [request] 

additional source Veron, J.E.N., Pichon, M. (1980). Scleractinia of Eastern Australia – Part III. Family Agariciidae, Siderastreidae, Fungiidae, Oculinidae, Merulinidae, Mussidae, Pectinidae, Caryophyllidae, Dendrophylliidae. Australian Institute of Marine Science Monograph Series. 4: 1-459. [details]   

additional source Veron JEN. (2000). Corals of the World. Vol. 1–3. Australian Institute of Marine Science and CRR, Queensland, Australia.  [details]   

additional source Benzoni F, Arrigoni R, Waheed Z, Stefani F, Hoeksema BW (2014) Phylogenetic relationships and revision of the genus Blastomussa (Cnidaria: Anthozoa: Scleractinia) with description of a new species. Raffles Bulletin of Zoology 62: 358-378. [details]   
 
 Present  Inaccurate  Introduced: alien  Containing type locality 
 

From editor or global species database
Biology zooxanthellate [details]

From other sources
Description This is the smallest mussid, but has the typical fleshy polyps of the family. Colonies rarely exceed a diameter of 25-30 cm. Calices are 4-9 mm diameter, and septa contain few strong but blunt spines, commonly one on each near the wall. Colonies are cerioid, phaceloid, or with both conditions occurring in the same colony. When the cerioid growth form exists, colonies are low and encrusting. Even here, there may be little or no organic tissue connecting adjacent polyps, and phaceloid corallites usually occur near the perimeter of the colony. Wholly phaceloid growth forms have a greater thickness, with individual corallites reaching 6 cm tall, of which the top 15 mm is enveloped by tissue (see the 3 b/w photos for variation). This species favours small crevices or steep parts of reef slopes. It can be found equally on exposed reef slopes and slightly sedimented areas, and may be recorded down to at least 50 m depth in fairly dark and cryptic conditions as well as in moderately lit areas. It is very rarely encountered in shallow or exposed conditions. The cerioid condition becomes more common in the western Indian Ocean region. (Sheppard, 1998 <308>).
Corallites are less than 7 mm in diameter. Septa are in three cycles, of which only the first two reach the columella. Colour: dark red or greenish-brown (two colour morphs). Abundance: uncommon. (Veron, 1986 <57>)
Always distinctive. Corallites in the colony are widely spaced providing room for the fleshy mantles of the polyp to expand. Colour: mantles red or green with a bright green centre, making the red variety a spectacular find underwater. Habitat: diverse reef areas, but never common. (Richmond, 1997) [details]

Spelling Spelled B. merletti in Sheppard 1987 <63> and 1998 <308>. Type locality: New Caledonia (Veron, 1986). [details]
 

LanguageName 
English branched cup coral  [details]
Japanese カビラタバサンゴ  [details]