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A review of the Indo-West Pacific species of the genus Glyphocrangon A. Milne-Edwards, 1881 (excluding the G. caeca species group) (Crustacea: Decapoda: Caridea: Glyphocrangonidae)
Komai, T. (2004). A review of the Indo-West Pacific species of the genus Glyphocrangon A. Milne-Edwards, 1881 (excluding the G. caeca species group) (Crustacea: Decapoda: Caridea: Glyphocrangonidae), in: Marshall, B.A. et al. (Ed.) Tropical Deep-Sea Benthos 23. Mémoires du Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle (1993), 191: pp. 375-610
In: Marshall, B.A.; Richer de Forges, B. (Ed.) (2004). Tropical Deep-Sea Benthos 23. Mémoires du Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle (1993), 191. Publications Scientifiques du Muséum: Paris. ISBN 2-85653-557-7. 640 + 1 cd-rom pp.
In: Mémoires du Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle (1993). Éditions du Muséum: Paris. ISSN 1243-4442; e-ISSN 1768-305X
Peer reviewed article  

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Keywords
    Classification > Taxonomy
    Glyphocrangon A. Milne-Edwards, 1881 [WoRMS]
    Marine

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  • Komai, T.

Abstract
    A review of the species of the caridean genus Glyphocrangon A. Milne-Edwards, 1881 from the Indo-West Pacific Oceans is presented based on rich collections formed during French expeditions to various regions, and supplemented by extensive material deposited in various institutions throughout the world. The genus is divided into two informal groups primarily based on the development of the eye and the presence or absence of arthrobranchs on the first and second pereopods. This study treats species characterized by a well-developed eye and the presence of arthrobranchs on the first and second pereopods (herein called the Glyphocrangon spinicauda species group). A total of 54 species are recognized in the G. spinicauda species group from the Indo-West Pacific region. Of these, the following 28 are new to science: G. albatrossae (Philippines), G. amblytes (Madagascar and South Africa), G. armata (New Caledonia, Vanuatu, Fiji, Wallis and Futuna islands), G. boletifera (Gulf of Aden), G. chacei (Philippines), G. confusa (Indonesia), G. cornuta (New Caledonia), G. crosnieri (Madagascar), G. conodactylus (New Caledonia), G. dimorpha (New Caledonia), G. ferox (Madagascar), G. formosana (Taiwan and East China Sea), G. indonesiensis (Philippines and Indonesia), G. kapala (eastern Australia), G. saintlaurentae (western Indian Ocean), G. major (New Caledonia), G. lineata (Indonesia and northwestern Australia), G. parva (Philippines), G. perplexa (Japan and Taiwan), G. proxima (Philippines and Indonesia), G. punctata (Philippines), G. richeri (Wallis and Futuna islands), G. robusta (Philippines), G. rubricinctuta (Wallis and Futuna islands), G. runcinata (East China Sea), G. similior (Coral Sea), G. speciosa (New Caledonia), and G. tasmanica (Tasman Sea). Glyphocrangon andamanensis Wood-Mason & Alcock, 1891 and G. mabahissae Calman, 1939, which have been considered to be synonymous with G. investigatoris Wood-Mason in Wood-Mason & Alcock, 1891 and G. dentata Barnard, 1926 respectively, are found to be distinct species. Glyphocrangon juxtaculeata Chace, 1984, the holotype of which is a juvenile, is considered to be a junior subjective synonym of G. regalis Bate, 1888. Glyphocrangon joani Allen & Butler, 1994 is treated as a junior synonym of G. fimbriata Komai & Takeuchi, 1994. Plastocrangon Alcock, 1901 is interpreted as a synonym of Glyphocrangon. The new species are fully described and illustrated, and all but three of the previously known species are redescribed and illustrated: G. gilesii and G. smithii being diagnosed on the basis of published information, G. unguiculata Wood-Mason in Wood-Mason & Alcock, 1891 on published information and provisionally identified material from the western Pacific. One obscurely diagnosed species, G. wagini Burukovsky, 1990 from the southeastern Pacific, is also redescribed in order to establish its affinities. Lectotypes are designated for G. acuminata Bate, 1888, G. pugnax de Man, 1918, G. assimilis de Man, 1918, G. sibogae de Man, 1918, and G. megalophthalma de Man, 1918. Identification key, separated by sex, is provided. This study reveals that most Glyphocrangon species have restricted geographical ranges, with only G. caecescens occurring in both the western Pacific and Indian oceans. The geographic and bathymetric distributions of the treated species are summarized.

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