WoRMS name details

Leucodore Johnston, 1838

325179  (urn:lsid:marinespecies.org:taxname:325179)

 unaccepted (subjective synonym)
Genus
Species Leucodore audax Quatrefages, 1866 accepted as Polydora ciliata (Johnston, 1838) (subjective synonym)
Species Leucodore calcarea (Templeton, 1836) accepted as Polydora calcarea (Templeton, 1836) (superseded subsequent combination)
Species Leucodore ciliatus Johnston, 1838 accepted as Polydora ciliata (Johnston, 1838) (superseded original combination)
Species Leucodore coecum Örsted, 1843 accepted as Dipolydora coeca (Örsted, 1843) (superseded original combination)
Species Leucodore dubius Quatrefages, 1866 accepted as Polydora ciliata (Johnston, 1838) (subjective synonym)
Species Leucodore fabricii Quatrefages, 1866 accepted as Polydora ciliata (Johnston, 1838) (subjective synonym)
Species Leucodore muticum Leuckart, 1849
Species Leucodore nasutus Quatrefages, 1866 accepted as Polydora ciliata (Johnston, 1838) (subjective synonym)
Species Leucodore sanguinea Giard, 1881 accepted as Polydora hoplura Claparède, 1868 (subjective synonym)
Species Leucodore socialis Schmarda, 1861 accepted as Dipolydora socialis (Schmarda, 1861) (superseded original combination)
marine, brackish, fresh, terrestrial
recent only
Johnston, George. (1838). Miscellanea Zoologica. III. — The British Ariciadae. <em>Magazine of Zoology and Botany, Edinburgh.</em> 2: 63-73, plates II-III., available online at https://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/40025966
page(s): 66 [details]   

(of Leucodore ciliatus Johnston, 1838) Johnston, George. (1838). Miscellanea Zoologica. III. — The British Ariciadae. <em>Magazine of Zoology and Botany, Edinburgh.</em> 2: 63-73, plates II-III., available online at https://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/40025966
page(s): 66-68, plate III figs. 1-6 [details]   
Etymology Named Leucodore as a Latinization of the family name of John Whitgift, a former Archbishop of Canterbury, who was an...  
Etymology Named Leucodore as a Latinization of the family name of John Whitgift, a former Archbishop of Canterbury, who was an advisor to and a favourite of Queen Elizabeth I. Johnston (1838: 66) gives the etymology thus in a footnote extending onto page 67: "“Name from [greek for] white, and [greek for] a gift: The naturalist who has experienced the joys of finding a hitherto unseen animal, and to whom the pleasing duty has been received of publishing an additional illustration of the wisdom of his Creator, and of filling up a blank in our knowledge of His works, will at once divine the origin of this name strangely applied to a worm. “Nomen habes niveis nunc inscriptum ergo Iapillis." The scholar may remember that the name [Leucodore] was originally formed by some classical wit for Dr Whitgift, the famous Archbishop of Canterbury … [the Latin phrase is part of an epitaph for the clergyman John Whitgift, 1530 – 1604, making allusion to his name]” [details]
Read, G.; Fauchald, K. (Ed.) (2021). World Polychaeta Database. Leucodore Johnston, 1838. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at: http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=325179 on 2021-10-28
Date
action
by
2008-03-05 14:39:51Z
created
2008-03-26 11:36:43Z
changed
2015-08-12 03:19:57Z
changed

Creative Commons License The webpage text is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License


original description Johnston, George. (1838). Miscellanea Zoologica. III. — The British Ariciadae. <em>Magazine of Zoology and Botany, Edinburgh.</em> 2: 63-73, plates II-III., available online at https://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/40025966
page(s): 66 [details]   

original description  (of Leucodore ciliatus Johnston, 1838) Johnston, George. (1838). Miscellanea Zoologica. III. — The British Ariciadae. <em>Magazine of Zoology and Botany, Edinburgh.</em> 2: 63-73, plates II-III., available online at https://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/40025966
page(s): 66-68, plate III figs. 1-6 [details]   
From editor or global species database
Etymology Named Leucodore as a Latinization of the family name of John Whitgift, a former Archbishop of Canterbury, who was an advisor to and a favourite of Queen Elizabeth I. Johnston (1838: 66) gives the etymology thus in a footnote extending onto page 67: "“Name from [greek for] white, and [greek for] a gift: The naturalist who has experienced the joys of finding a hitherto unseen animal, and to whom the pleasing duty has been received of publishing an additional illustration of the wisdom of his Creator, and of filling up a blank in our knowledge of His works, will at once divine the origin of this name strangely applied to a worm. “Nomen habes niveis nunc inscriptum ergo Iapillis." The scholar may remember that the name [Leucodore] was originally formed by some classical wit for Dr Whitgift, the famous Archbishop of Canterbury … [the Latin phrase is part of an epitaph for the clergyman John Whitgift, 1530 – 1604, making allusion to his name]” [details]

Spelling According to Hartman (1959: 378) subsequent variant spellings were Leucadore, Leucodora, Leucodorum (which was used by Örsted, 1844) Why Örsted used Leucodorum ciliatum [for Leucodore] using a conversion to the neuter is not explicable  [details]
Leucodore ciliatus Johnston (original plate)
 Leucodore ciliatus ...
[image from typetaxon]