WoRMS taxon details

Tubastraea coccinea Lesson, 1829

291251  (urn:lsid:marinespecies.org:taxname:291251)

accepted
Species
marine, brackish, fresh, terrestrial
Lesson, R.P. (1829). Zoophytes. In: Voyage medical autour du Monde execute par I ordre du Roi sur la Corvette de Sa Majeste la Coquille, pendant les annees 1822. 1823, 1824, et 1825...par M.L.I. Duperey, Capitaine de Fregate, Zoologie,. 2(2), 151 pages, 16 plates. Paris: A. Bertrand., available online at https://doi.org/10.5962/bhl.title.59769 [details]   
Depth range 0-110 m  
Depth range 0-110 m [details]
Hoeksema, B. W.; Cairns, S. (2018). World List of Scleractinia. Tubastraea coccinea Lesson, 1829. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at: http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=291251 on 2018-12-19
Date
action
by
2008-01-16 10:35:54Z
created
2010-08-13 14:02:33Z
checked
2018-08-09 16:47:36Z
changed

Creative Commons License The webpage text is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License


original description Lesson, R.P. (1829). Zoophytes. In: Voyage medical autour du Monde execute par I ordre du Roi sur la Corvette de Sa Majeste la Coquille, pendant les annees 1822. 1823, 1824, et 1825...par M.L.I. Duperey, Capitaine de Fregate, Zoologie,. 2(2), 151 pages, 16 plates. Paris: A. Bertrand., available online at https://doi.org/10.5962/bhl.title.59769 [details]   

original description  (ofTubastaea coccinea Lesson, 1830) Lesson, R.P. (1830). Zoophytes. In: Vovage autour du monde, exécute par ordre du Roi sur la corvette La Coquille" pendant les années 1822-25. (par M. L.-J. Duperrey). <em>Z Zoologie.</em> 2. Paris, 1826-1830. (vol. 2, pt 2, 2e division, 1830)., available online at http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/119040#page/9/mode/1up [details]   

original description  (ofLobopsammia aurea Quoy & Gaimard, 1833) Quoy J.R.C. & Gaimard J.P. (1832-1835). <i>Voyage de découvertes de l'"Astrolabe" exécuté par ordre du Roi, pendant les années 1826-1829, sous le commandement de M. J. Dumont d'Urville. Zoologie.</i> Paris: Tastu. 1: I-L 1-264; 2(1): 1-321 [1832]; 2(2): 321-686 [1833]; 3(1): 1-366 [1834]; 3(2): 367-954 [1835]; Atlas (Mollusques): pls 1-93 [1833]. , available online at http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/bibliography/2132 [details]   

original description  (ofDendrophyllia aurantiaca Quoy & Gaimard, 1833) Quoy J.R.C. & Gaimard J.P. (1832-1835). <i>Voyage de découvertes de l'"Astrolabe" exécuté par ordre du Roi, pendant les années 1826-1829, sous le commandement de M. J. Dumont d'Urville. Zoologie.</i> Paris: Tastu. 1: I-L 1-264; 2(1): 1-321 [1832]; 2(2): 321-686 [1833]; 3(1): 1-366 [1834]; 3(2): 367-954 [1835]; Atlas (Mollusques): pls 1-93 [1833]. , available online at http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/bibliography/2132 [details]   

original description  (ofDendrophyllia surcularis Verrill, 1869) Verrill, A. E. (1869). On New and imperfectly known Echinoderms and Corals. <em>Proceedings of the Boston Society of Natural HIstory.</em> 12: 381-391., available online at http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/9494023#page/389/mode/1up [details]   

original description  (ofDendrophyllia turbinata Nemenzo, 1960) Nemenzo F (1960) Systematic studies on Philippine shallow water scleractinians: IV. Suborder Dendrophylliida. Natural and Applied Science Bulletin, University of the Philippines 18: 1-22. [details]   

original description  (ofCoenopsammia tenuilamellosa Milne Edwards & Haime, 1848) Milne Edwards H, Haime J (1848) Mémoire 3. Monographie des eupsammides. Annales des Sciences Naturelles, Zoologie, Series 3, 10: 65-114, pl. 1. [details]   

original description  (ofCoenopsammia radiata Verrill, 1864) Verrill, A.E. (1864). List of the polyps and corals sent by the Museum of Comparative Zoology to other institutions in exchange, with annotations. <em>Bulletin of the Museum of Comparative Zoology.</em> 1: 29-60., available online at http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/30465#page/37/mode/1up [details]   

original description  (ofAstropsammia pedersenii Verrill, 1869) Verrill, A. E. (1869). On New and imperfectly known Echinoderms and Corals. <em>Proceedings of the Boston Society of Natural HIstory.</em> 12: 381-391., available online at http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/9494023#page/389/mode/1up [details]   

original description  (ofPlacopsammia darwini Duncan, 1876) Duncan, P. M. (1876). Notices of some Deep-sea and Littoral Corals from the Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean, Indian, New-Zealand, Persian Gulf, and Japanese &c. Seas. <em>Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London.</em> 44: 428-442, pls. 38-41. [details]   

original description  (ofTubastraea tenuilamellosa (Milne Edwards & Haime, 1848)) Milne Edwards H, Haime J (1848) Mémoire 3. Monographie des eupsammides. Annales des Sciences Naturelles, Zoologie, Series 3, 10: 65-114, pl. 1. [details]   

original description  (ofDendrophyllia tenuilamellosa Verrill, 1870) Verrill, A.E. 1870. Review of the polyps and corals of the West Coast of America. Transactions of the Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences 1: 377-558, pls. 5-10. [details]   

original description  (ofDendrophyllia circularis Verrill, 1869) Verrill, A. E. (1869). On New and imperfectly known Echinoderms and Corals. <em>Proceedings of the Boston Society of Natural HIstory.</em> 12: 381-391., available online at http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/9494023#page/389/mode/1up [details]   

original description  (ofLobopsammia darwini Duncan, 1876) Duncan, P. M. (1876). Notices of some Deep-sea and Littoral Corals from the Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean, Indian, New-Zealand, Persian Gulf, and Japanese &c. Seas. <em>Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London.</em> 44: 428-442, pls. 38-41. [details]   

context source (Introduced species) Fofonoff, P.W.; Ruiz, G.M.; Steves, B.; Carlton, J.T. (2014). National Exotic Marine and Estuarine Species Information System (NEMESIS), available online at http://invasions.si.edu/nemesis [details]   

context source (HKRMS) Clark, T. H. (1997). The distribution of ahermatypic corals at cape d' Aguilar, Hong Kong. <em>In: Morton B, editor. Proceedings of the Eighth International Marine Biological Workshop: The Marine Flora and Fauna of Hong Kong and Southern China. Hong Kong University Press, Hong Kong.</em> 4: 219-233. [details]   

basis of record Cairns, S.D.; Hoeksema, B.W. & van der Land, J. (2007). as a contribution to UNESCO-IOC Register of Marine Organisms. (look up in IMIS[details]   

additional source Cairns, S.D., Jaap, W.C., and J.C. Lang. 2009. Scleractinia (Cnidaria) of the Gulf of Mexico, Pp. 333–347 in Felder, D.L. and D.K. Camp (eds.), Gulf of Mexico–Origins, Waters, and Biota. Biodiversity. Texas A&M Press, College Station, Texas. [details]   

additional source Cairns, S.D. (2009). On line appendix: Phylogenetic list of the 711 valid Recent azooxanthellate scleractinian species with their junior synonyms and depth ranges, 28 pp. <em>In: Cold-Water Corals: The Biology and Geology of Deep-Sea Coral Habitats.</em> Cambridge University Press, Cambridge., available online at http://www.lophelia.org/online-appendices [details]   

additional source Cairns, S.D., 1998. Azooxanthellate Scleractinia (Cnidaria: Anthozoa) of Western Australia. Rec. of West. Austr. Mus. 18(4): 361-417, 9 pls.  [details]   

additional source Cairns, S.D., 2004. Azooxanthellate Scleractinia of Australia. Rec. Australian Mus., 56(3): 259-329, 12 pls. [details]   

additional source Cairns, S.D., and Keller, N.B., 1993. New taxa and distributional records of azooxanthellate Scleractinia from the tropical south-west Indian Ocean, with comments on their zoogeography and ecology. Ann. S. Afr. Mus. 103(5): 213-292, 13 pls.  [details]   

additional source Reyes-Bonilla, H. (2002). Checklist of valid names and synonyms of stony corals (Anthozoa: Scleractinia) from the eastern Pacific. <em>Journal of Natural History.</em> 36(1): 1-13., available online at https://doi.org/10.1080/713833841 [details]   

additional source Sammarco, P.; Porter, S.; Cairns, S. (2010). A new coral species introduced into the Atlantic Ocean - Tubastraea micranthus (Ehrenberg 1834) (Cnidaria, Anthozoa, Scleractinia): An invasive threat?. <em>Aquatic Invasions.</em> 5(2): 131-140., available online at https://doi.org/10.3391/ai.2010.5.2.02 [details]  OpenAccess publication 

additional source Cairns, S.D.; Gershwin, L.; Brook, F.J.; Pugh, P.; Dawson, E.W.; Ocaña O.V.; Vervoort, W.; Williams, G.; Watson, J.E.; Opresko, D.M.; Schuchert, P.; Hine, P.M.; Gordon, D.P.; Campbell, H.J.; Wright, A.J.; Sánchez, J.A.; Fautin, D.G. (2009). Phylum Cnidaria: corals, medusae, hydroids, myxozoans. <em>in: Gordon, D.P. (Ed.) (2009). New Zealand inventory of biodiversity: 1. Kingdom Animalia: Radiata, Lophotrochozoa, Deuterostomia.</em> pp. 59-101., available online at http://si-pddr.si.edu/handle/10088/8431 [details]  Available for editors  PDF available [request] 

redescription Cairns, S.D. (2000). A revision of the shallow-water azooxanthellate scleractinia of the Western Atlantic. <em>Studies on the fauna of Curacao and other Caribbean Islands.</em> 125: 1-235. [details]   

redescription Cairns, S.D.; Zibrowius, H. (1997). Cnidaria Anthozoa: Azooxanthellate Scleractinia from the Philippine and Indonesian regions. <em>in: Crosnier, A. et al. (Ed.) Résultats des Campagnes MUSORSTOM 16. Campagne Franco-Indonésienne KARUBAR. Mémoires du Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle. Série A, Zoologie.</em> 172: 27-244. (look up in IMIS[details]   

redescription Cairns, S.D., 1994. Scleractinia of the Temperate North Pacific. Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology, 557:150 pp., 42 plates, 3 figs.  [details]   

redescription Cairns, S.D., 1991. A revision of the ahermatypic Scleractinia of the Galápagos and Cocos Islands. Smith. Cont. Zool. 504: 32 pp., 12 pls.  [details]   
 
 Present  Inaccurate  Introduced: alien  Containing type locality 
 

From regional or thematic species database
Introduced species impact in Gulf of Mexico (IHO Sea Area) : Alters trophic interactions [details]

Introduced species impact in Brazilian part of the South Atlantic Ocean (Marine Region) : Adverse habitat modification [details]

Introduced species impact in Brazil (Nation) : Alters trophic interactions [details]

Introduced species impact in Gulf of Mexico (IHO Sea Area) : Outcompetes native species for resources and/or space [details]

Introduced species impact in Brazil (Nation) : Outcompetes native species for resources and/or space [details]

Introduced species remark In Brazil (Nation) : A number of impacts have been studied in Brazilian waters, including: competition and overgrowth of native corals (Creed 2006; Silva et al. 2011); how settlement affects food webs by replacing hermatypic corals (containing symbiotic algae, relying partly on photosynthesis for nutrition) with corals which are exclusively carnivorous (Silva et al. 2011); and the inhibition of feeding by coral reef fishes (Lages et al. 2011). [details]

Introduced species remark In Gulf of Mexico (IHO Sea Area) : In US waters, it has largely been confined to artificial substrates such as oil platforms, shipwrecks, and artificial reefs, but its spread to coral reefs is a concern, particularly in the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary in the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico. This species may compete with and overgrow native corals, potentially affecting food webs and altering the feeding habits of reef fish. [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Mexico (Nation) : Potential for spread via oil tanker fouling communities.  [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Gulf of Mexico (IHO Sea Area) : Potential for spread via oil tanker fouling communities.  [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Gulf of Mexico (IHO Sea Area) : Potential for spread via oil tanker fouling communities.  [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Brazil (Nation) : Hull fouling has probably been the major vector of transport between distant ocean regions, but the larvae can remain competent for 100 days, permitting regional dispersal by currents (Fenner 2001). Disposal by aquarists is a potential vector for future invasions (Shearer 2011). [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Mexico (Nation) : Potential for spread via oil tanker fouling communities.  [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Caribbean Sea (IHO Sea Area) : Hull fouling has probably been the major vector of transport between distant ocean regions, but the larvae can remain competent for 100 days, permitting regional dispersal by currents (Fenner 2001). Disposal by aquarists is a potential vector for future invasions (Shearer 2011). [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Belizean part of the Caribbean Sea : Hull fouling has probably been the major vector of transport between distant ocean regions, but the larvae can remain competent for 100 days, permitting regional dispersal by currents (Fenner 2001). Disposal by aquarists is a potential vector for future invasions (Shearer 2011). [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Cape Verdean part of the North Atlantic Ocean : Hull fouling has probably been the major vector of transport between distant ocean regions, but the larvae can remain competent for 100 days, permitting regional dispersal by currents (Fenner 2001). Disposal by aquarists is a potential vector for future invasions (Shearer 2011). [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Gulf of Mexico (IHO Sea Area) : Hull fouling has probably been the major vector of transport between distant ocean regions, but the larvae can remain competent for 100 days, permitting regional dispersal by currents (Fenner 2001). Disposal by aquarists is a potential vector for future i [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Gulf of Mexico (IHO Sea Area) : Hull fouling has probably been the major vector of transport between distant ocean regions, but the larvae can remain competent for 100 days, permitting regional dispersal by currents (Fenner 2001). Disposal by aquarists is a potential vector for future invasions (Shearer 2011). [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Jamaican part of the Caribbean Sea : Hull fouling has probably been the major vector of transport between distant ocean regions, but the larvae can remain competent for 100 days, permitting regional dispersal by currents (Fenner 2001). Disposal by aquarists is a potential vector for future invasions (Shearer 2011). [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Gulf of Guinea (IHO Sea Area) : Hull fouling has probably been the major vector of transport between distant ocean regions, but the larvae can remain competent for 100 days, permitting regional dispersal by currents (Fenner 2001). Disposal by aquarists is a potential vector for future invasions (Shearer 2011). [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Brazilian part of the South Atlantic Ocean (Marine Region) : Natural dispersal [details]

From other sources
Biology azooxanthellate [details]

Depth range 0-110 m [details]
 

LanguageName 
English orange cup coral  [details]
Japanese ヒメイボヤギ  [details]