WoRMS taxon details

Checked: verified by a taxonomic editorAcropora eurystoma (Klunzinger, 1879)

207108 (urn:lsid:marinespecies.org:taxname:207108)
accepted
Species
marine, fresh, terrestrial
Klunzinger, C.B. 1879. Die Korallenthiere des Rothen Meeres, 2. Theil: Die Steinkorallen. Erster Abschnitt: Die Madreporaceen und Oculinaceen: 1-88, pls. 1-10. Gutmann, Berlin. [details]   
Unreviewed: has not been verified by a taxonomic editorDescription Colonies are small and bushy, usually 40 cm...  
Unreviewed: has not been verified by a taxonomic editorDescription Colonies are small and bushy, usually >40 cm across, very rarely with a tendency to develop small plates or brackets. Branches are straight, up to 1 cm thick, and branch frequently. The species is distinctive because the branches have wide radial corallites with thick, flared lips. This is very conspicuous underwater, more so than with the cleaned skeleton. The septa in the radial corallites are also large and clearly visible underwater. Towards the base of the branches, the corallites become more immersed, but retain their open, gaping appearance. Living colonies are pale cream. The species prefers sheltered areas which are well illuminated, between 5 and 25 m deep (Sheppard, 1998). [details]
Hoeksema, B. (2013). Acropora eurystoma (Klunzinger, 1879). Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=207108 on 2017-11-23

Date
action
by
1997-02-22 16:55:09Z
created
2000-09-28 07:24:50Z
changed
Garcia, Maria
2008-01-16 10:35:54Z
changed
2013-09-22 08:21:59Z
changed

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original description Klunzinger, C.B. 1879. Die Korallenthiere des Rothen Meeres, 2. Theil: Die Steinkorallen. Erster Abschnitt: Die Madreporaceen und Oculinaceen: 1-88, pls. 1-10. Gutmann, Berlin. [details]   

original description  (ofChecked: verified by a taxonomic editorAcropora pagoensis Hoffmeister, 1925) Hoffmeister, J.E. (1925). Some corals from America Samoa and the Fiji Islands. Papers From The Department Of Marine Biology Of The Carnegie Institution Of Washington. 22: 1-90, pls. 1-23. [details]   

basis of record Sheppard, C.R.C. (1987). Coral species of the Indian Ocean and adjacent seas: a synonymised compilation and some regional distribution patterns. Atoll Research Bulletin Nr 307 [details]   

additional source Wallace, C.C., 1999. Staghorn corals of the world: a revision of the coral genus Acropora (Scleractinia; Astrocoeniina; Acroporidae) worldwide, with emphasis on morphology, phylogeny and biogeography. : i-xviii, 1-421. [details]   

additional source Cairns, S.D.; Hoeksema, B.W. & van der Land, J. (2007). as a contribution to UNESCO-IOC Register of Marine Organisms. (look up in IMIS[details]   

basis of record  (ofChecked: verified by a taxonomic editorAcropora pagoensis Hoffmeister, 1925) Fautin, Daphne G. (2013). Hexacorallians of the World., available online at http://hercules.kgs.ku.edu/Hexacoral/Anemone2/ [details]   

source of synonymy  (ofChecked: verified by a taxonomic editorAcropora pagoensis Hoffmeister, 1925) Scheer, G. & Pillai, C.S.G. 1983. Report on the stony corals from the Red Sea. Zoologica, Stuttgart 45 (133): 1-198, pls. 1-41. [details]   
 
 Present  Inaccurate  Introduced: alien 
 

From other sources
Unreviewed: has not been verified by a taxonomic editorBiology zooxanthellate [details]

Unreviewed: has not been verified by a taxonomic editorDescription Colonies are small and bushy, usually >40 cm across, very rarely with a tendency to develop small plates or brackets. Branches are straight, up to 1 cm thick, and branch frequently. The species is distinctive because the branches have wide radial corallites with thick, flared lips. This is very conspicuous underwater, more so than with the cleaned skeleton. The septa in the radial corallites are also large and clearly visible underwater. Towards the base of the branches, the corallites become more immersed, but retain their open, gaping appearance. Living colonies are pale cream. The species prefers sheltered areas which are well illuminated, between 5 and 25 m deep (Sheppard, 1998). [details]