WoRMS taxon details

Caprella mutica Schurin, 1935

146768  (urn:lsid:marinespecies.org:taxname:146768)

accepted
Species
marine, brackish, fresh, terrestrial
Schurin, A. (1935). Zur Fauna der Caprelliden der Bucht Peters der Grosse (Japanisches Meer. <em>Zoologischer Anzeiger.</em> 112: 198-203.
page(s): 198 [details]  Available for editors  PDF available [request] 
Horton, T.; Lowry, J.; De Broyer, C.; Bellan-Santini, D.; Coleman, C. O.; Corbari, L.; Costello, M. J.; Daneliya, M.; Dauvin, J-C.; Fišer, C.; Gasca, R.; Grabowski, M.; Guerra-García, J. M.; Hendrycks, E.; Hughes, L.; Jaume, D.; Jazdzewski, K.; Kim, Y.-H.; King, R.; Krapp-Schickel, T.; LeCroy, S.; Lörz, A.-N.; Mamos, T.; Senna, A. R.; Serejo, C.; Sket, B.; Souza-Filho, J. F.; Tandberg, A.H.; Thomas, J.; Thurston, M.; Vader, W.; Väinölä, R.; Vonk, R.; White, K.; Zeidler, W. (2018). World Amphipoda Database. Caprella mutica Schurin, 1935. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at: http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=146768 on 2018-11-15
Date
action
by
2005-01-31 08:36:51Z
created
2007-01-03 09:05:25Z
changed
2009-11-18 12:16:11Z
checked

Creative Commons License The webpage text is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License


original description Schurin, A. (1935). Zur Fauna der Caprelliden der Bucht Peters der Grosse (Japanisches Meer. <em>Zoologischer Anzeiger.</em> 112: 198-203.
page(s): 198 [details]  Available for editors  PDF available [request] 

original description  (ofCaprella macho Platvoet, de Bruyne & Gmelig Meyling, 1995) Platvoet, D., de Bruyne, R.H., Gmelig Meyling, A.W. (1995). Description of a new Caprella-species from the Netherlands: Caprella macho nov. spec. (Crustacea, Amphipoda, Caprellidae). <em>Bulletin Zoölogisch Museum, Universiteit van Amsterdam.</em> 15(1): 1-4. [details]   

context source (Introduced species) Katsanevakis, S.; Bogucarskis, K.; Gatto, F.; Vandekerkhove, J.; Deriu, I.; Cardoso A.S. (2012). Building the European Alien Species Information Network (EASIN): a novel approach for the exploration of distributed alien species data. <em>BioInvasions Records.</em> 1: 235-245., available online at http://easin.jrc.ec.europa.eu [details]  Available for editors  PDF available [request] 

context source (Schelde) (2010). Bedreiging voor biodiversiteit. Indicatoren voor het Schelde-estuarium. <em>Opgemaakt in opdracht van Afdeling Maritieme Toegang, projectgroep EcoWaMorSe, Vlaams Nederlandse Scheldecommissie. VLIZ Information Sheets, 200. Vlaams Instituut voor de Zee (VLIZ): Oostende.</em> 7 pp. (look up in IMIS[details]   

basis of record Ashton, G.; Karin Boos, Richard Shucksmith and Elizabeth Cook (2006). Rapid assessment of the distribution of marine non-native species in marinas in Scotland. Aquatic invasions 1(4): 209-213. [details]   

additional source Webber, W.R.; Fenwick, G.D.; Bradford-Grieve, J.M.; Eagar S.G.; Buckeridge, J.S.; Poore, G.C.B.; Dawson, E.W.; Watling, L.; Jones, J.B.; Wells, J.B.J.; Bruce, N.L.; Ahyong, S.T.; Larsen, K.; Chapman, M.A.; Olesen, J.; Ho, J.; Green, J.D.; Shiel, R.J.; Rocha, C.E.F.; Lörz, A.; Bird, G.J.; Charleston, W.A. (2010). Phylum Arthropoda Subphylum Crustacea: shrimps, crabs, lobsters, barnacles, slaters, and kin, in: Gordon, D.P. (Ed.) (2010). New Zealand inventory of biodiversity: 2. Kingdom Animalia: Chaetognatha, Ecdysozoa, Ichnofossils. pp. 98-232. [details]   

additional source Turcotte, C.; Sainte Marie, B. (2009). Biological synopsis of the Japanese skeleton shrimp Caprella mutica. Canadian Manuscript Report of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences. 2903: 1-26., available online at http://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2010/mpo-dfo/Fs97-4-2903-eng.pdf [details]   

additional source Streftaris, N.; Zenetos, A.; Papathanassiou, E. (2005). Globalisation in marine ecosystems: the story of non-indigenous marine species across European seas. <em>Oceanogr. Mar. Biol. Ann. Rev.</em> 43: 419-453. (look up in IMIS[details]  Available for editors  PDF available [request] 
 
 Present  Inaccurate  Introduced: alien  Containing type locality 
 

From regional or thematic species database
Introduced species abundance in German part of the North Sea (Marine Region) : Dominant [details]

Introduced species abundance in United Kingdom part of the Celtic Sea (Marine Region) : Common [details]

Introduced species abundance in North Sea (IHO Sea Area) : Common [details]

Introduced species abundance in English Channel (IHO Sea Area) : Common [details]

Introduced species impact in Norwegian part of the North Sea (Marine Region) : Water abstraction or nuisance fouling [details]

Introduced species impact in Belgian part of the North Sea : Other impact - undefined or uncertain [details]

Introduced species impact in Norwegian part of the North Sea (Marine Region) : Other impact - undefined or uncertain [details]

Introduced species impact in United Kingdom part of the Celtic Sea (Marine Region) : Water abstraction or nuisance fouling [details]

Introduced species impact in North Sea (IHO Sea Area) : Other impact - undefined or uncertain [details]

Introduced species impact in New Zealand (Nation) : Other impact - undefined or uncertain [details]

Introduced species remark In French part of the English Channel (Marine Region) : Studies of its economic and ecological impacts are limited, but observations indicate that C. mutica can affect aquaculture operations, displace native caprellids, and affect the feeding of native fishes (Ashton 2006; Page et al. 2007; Shucksmith et al. 2009; Turcotte and Sainte Marie 2009). [details]

Introduced species remark In New Zealand (Nation) : Studies of its economic and ecological impacts are limited, but observations indicate that C. mutica can affect aquaculture operations, displace native caprellids, and affect the feeding of native fishes (Ashton 2006; Page et al. 2007; Shucksmith et al. 2009; Turcotte and Sainte Marie 2009). [details]

Introduced species remark In Germany (Nation) : Studies of its economic and ecological impacts are limited, but observations indicate that C. mutica can affect aquaculture operations, displace native caprellids, and affect the feeding of native fishes (Ashton 2006; Page et al. 2007; Shucksmith et al. 2009; Turcotte and Sainte Marie 2009). [details]

Introduced species remark In North Sea (IHO Sea Area) : Studies of its economic and ecological impacts are limited, but observations indicate that C. mutica can affect aquaculture operations, displace native caprellids, and affect the feeding of native fishes (Ashton 2006; Page et al. 2007; Shucksmith et al. 2009; Turcotte and Sainte Marie 2009). [details]

Introduced species remark In Norwegian part of the North Sea (Marne Region) : Studies of its economic and ecological impacts are limited, but observations indicate that C. mutica can affect aquaculture operations, displace native caprellids, and affect the feeding of native fishes (Ashton 2006; Page et al. 2007; Shucksmith et al. 2009; Turcotte and Sainte Marie 2009). [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in English Channel (IHO Sea Area) : Human activities in coastal waters such as shipping and the movement of small boats around the coast, and aquaculture activities are the factors most likely to influence the spread and distribution of Caprella mutica.
Potential for transport in ballast or [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in New Zealand (Nation) : Caprellids are capable of long-distance dispersal on floating seaweeds or other objects, but ballast water, ship fouling, and the culture of Pacific Oysters (Crassostrea gigas) are likely vectors for the transport of C. mutica to different regions of the world. [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Dutch part of the North Sea : Shipping [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Norwegian part of the North Sea (Marine Region) : Natural dispersal [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Dutch part of the North Sea : Fisheries: accidental with deliberate translocations of fish or shellfish [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Norwegian part of the North Sea (Marine Region) : Caprellids are capable of long-distance dispersal on floating seaweeds or other objects, but ballast water, ship fouling, and the culture of Pacific Oysters (Crassostrea gigas) are likely vectors for the transport of C. mutica to different regions of the world. [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in United Kingdom part of the Celtic Sea (Marine Region) : Ships: general [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in French part of the English Channel (Marine Region) : Caprellids are capable of long-distance dispersal on floating seaweeds or other objects, but ballast water, ship fouling, and the culture of Pacific Oysters (Crassostrea gigas) are likely vectors for the transport of C. mutica to different regions of the world. [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in North Sea (IHO Sea Area) : Human activities in coastal waters such as shipping and the movement of small boats around the coast, and aquaculture activities are the factors most likely to influence the spread and distribution of Caprella mutica.
Potential for transport in ballast or [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Belgian part of the North Sea: Ships: accidental with ballast water, sea water systems, live wells or other deck basins [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in New Zealand (Nation) : Ships: accidental as attached or free-living fouling organisms [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Dutch part of the North Sea : Could have been arti?cially introduced from other man-made constructions and habitats. [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Germany (Nation) : Caprellids are capable of long-distance dispersal on floating seaweeds or other objects, but ballast water, ship fouling, and the culture of Pacific Oysters (Crassostrea gigas) are likely vectors for the transport of C. mutica to different regions of the world. [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in North Sea (IHO Sea Area) : Caprellids are capable of long-distance dispersal on floating seaweeds or other objects, but ballast water, ship fouling, and the culture of Pacific Oysters (Crassostrea gigas) are likely vectors for the transport of C. mutica to different regions of the world. [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Norwegian part of the North Sea (Marine Region) : Ships: general [details]

From other sources
Alien species The origin of the Japanese skeleton shrimp Caprella mutica is East Asia, near Japan. The species was brought to Europe trough transport in ballast water of cargo ships or together with oysters imported by the farming industry. The first specimens of the Japanese skeleton shrimp in Belgium were found in 1998 on buoys in front of the coast of Zeebrugge. During the following years the species spread to the other ports along the Belgian coast. The species tolerates a wide gradient in temperature and salinity and might have a ecological influence by competing with indigenous species. [details]
 

LanguageName 
Dutch machospookkreeftharig spookkreeftje  [details]
English Japanese skeleton shrimp  [details]
French caprelle japonaise  [details]
Japanese コシトゲワレカラ  [details]