WoRMS source details

Day, John H. (1977). A review of the Australian and New Zealand Orbiniidae (Annelida: Polychaeta). 217-246. In: Reish, Donald J.; Fauchald, Kristian (Eds.). Essays on polychaetous annelids in memory of Dr. Olga Hartman. The Allan Hancock Foundation, University of Southern California.
49624
Day, John H.
1977
A review of the Australian and New Zealand Orbiniidae (Annelida: Polychaeta).
217-246. In: Reish, Donald J.; Fauchald, Kristian (Eds.). Essays on polychaetous annelids in memory of Dr. Olga Hartman. The Allan Hancock Foundation, University of Southern California.
Publication
World Polychaeta Database (WPolyD)
Available for editors  PDF available [request]
[None. Work starts as follows:]
In 1957, Dr. Olga Hartman published a most valuable account of the family Orbiniidae. She defined the subfamilies and genera, listed the known species with their synonyms and, inter alia, described three new species and a new subspecies from Australia. In this volume it seems appropriate to carry on with this part of her work and give an account of all of the species now known from Australia and New Zealand.
Excluding records from Auckland and Campbell Islands, an examination showed that 11 valid species had been described under various names. Material in the Australian Museum and in other institutions and museums in Queensland, New South Wales, South Australia, Western Australia and New Zealand provided hundreds of specimens belonging to 20 species, of which six are new. Space does not permit me to deal fully with them all; this must await a separate paper. I have confined myself to the description of the new species and supplementary notes on the others. It is also necessary to erect a new, genus to replace Haploscoloplos, whose definition does not accord with the character of its type species.
In 1973 I emended the definitions of the genera of the subfamily Orbiniinae and showed that the abruptly tapered "flail-setae" of the abdominal neuropodia that had been thought to characterize the genus Scolaricia are not restricted to that genus, so that Scolaricia became a synonym of Scoloplos. The abundant Australian material showed that flail-setae are common in the genera Scoloplos, Orbinia and Phylo, but the abrupt tapering of the setal tip may be either well or poorly marked; it is a useful specific character. Another useful character which has seldom been used in descriptions is the shape of the abdominal neuropodia. They are usually bilobed on the first few feet, but thereafter the two lobes may remain subequal or the inner (preacicular) lobe may grow longer than the outer (postacicular) lobe or vice versa. In some cases one or other lobe is lost and the neuropodium becomes uniramous.
Systematics, Taxonomy
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2013-01-12 18:30:12Z
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Holotype AM W.6038, geounit Moreton Bay, identified as Scoloplos (Scoloplos) difficilis Day, 1977
Holotype AM W.7345, geounit Hunter River, identified as Leitoscoloplos normalis Day, 1977
Holotype AM W.7347, geounit South Australia (state), identified as Leitoscoloplos latibranchus Day, 1977
 Depth range

Between low water neap tide (LWN) and low water spring tide (LWS).  [details]

 Depth range

Not stated. Unknown.  [details]

 Distribution

Australia: mouth of Murray River (South Australia).  [details]

 Distribution

Temperate coasts of Australia, from SW Australia (Blackwood Estuary) to New South Wales.  [details]

 Distribution

Australia, on temperate to subtropical shores: New South Wales (Broulee; Burrill Lake; Lake Conjola; Lake Cuttage; ... [details]

 Distribution

Australia: New South Wales (Wallis Lake; north of Coff's Harbour; Dee Why Lagoon; Hunter River; Sydney); Queensland ... [details]

 Etymology

The name of the genus Leitoscoloplos is derived from the Greek words leitos, meaning 'simple', and scoloplos, ... [details]

 Etymology

The specific epithet latibranchus is composed by the prefix of Latin origin lati-, meaning 'wide' or 'broad', and ... [details]

 Etymology

The specific epithet normalis is a Latin adjective meaning 'normal' or 'regular', but it is not clear if it refers ... [details]

 Etymology

Not stated in the original descripton. The specific epithet difficilis is a Latin adjective meaning 'difficult' or ... [details]

 Habitat

Not stated. Unknown.  [details]

 Habitat

Not stated. Unknown.  [details]

 Habitat

Shore. According to online data provided by the Australian Museum, the holotype was collected on sand flats. [details]

 Synonymy

Day (1977: 218) placed Haploscoloplos Monro, 1933 as a synonym of Scoloplos because specimens of the type species, ... [details]

 Type designation

Australia, New South Wales, Hunter River, Fullerton Cove (geocoordinates not provided, estimated with gazetteer to ... [details]

 Type locality

Mouth of Murray River, South Australia, Australia (gazetteer estimate -35.557°, long. 138.883°). [details]

 Type locality

Mouth of Jackson Creek, Moreton Bay, Queensland, Australia (gazetteer estimate -27.350°, 153.112°). [details]