Copepoda taxon details

Pennatula Linnaeus, 1758

128495  (urn:lsid:marinespecies.org:taxname:128495)

accepted
Genus
Pennatula filosa Linnaeus, 1758 accepted as Pennella filosa (Linnaeus, 1758) (type by original designation)

Species Pennatula filosa Linnaeus, 1758 accepted as Pennella filosa (Linnaeus, 1758) (original combination)
Species Pennatula sagitta Linnaeus, 1758 accepted as Pennella sagitta (Linnaeus, 1758) (original combination)
marine, brackish, fresh, terrestrial
Linnaeus, C. (1758). Systema Naturae per regna tria naturae, secundum classes, ordines, genera, species, cum characteribus, differentiis, synonymis, locis. <em>Editio decima, reformata [10th revised edition], vol. 1: 824 pp. Laurentius Salvius: Holmiae.</em> , available online at https://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/726886 [details]  Available for editors  PDF available 
Homonymy Linnaeus's Pennatula 1758 is a good name for the cnidarians, as this was used first. This homonym of the copepods was...  
Homonymy Linnaeus's Pennatula 1758 is a good name for the cnidarians, as this was used first. This homonym of the copepods was created when they were tacked on just because they kind of looked like the cnidarians. Linnaeus did not have a clue. This name is enshrined in the coelenterate order Pennatulacea, where the genus is still found, unburdened by parasitic copepods.

The first of these Linnaean copepod species was Pennatula filosa, taken from the Mediterranean swordfish. The second was Pennatula sagitta, found on the sargassum fish. Subsequent investigators mentioned that Linnaeus’s host notations were about the only useful characteristics he provided (Stebbing 1905). Since Linnaeus’s time, other features have been defined, and both species are valid. Oken (1815), without knowing their true nature, but seeing that these parasites were not as “other” coral-like polyps, proposed the appropriate name Pennella, the “little feather,” for the copepods. Linnaeus’s species names are retained, so that the two species are now Pennella sagitta (Linnaeus, 1758), the type species of Oken's genus, and Pennella filosa (Linnaeus, 1758), both now in the siphonostome family Pennellidae (see Kabata 1979). [details]
Copepoda (2021). Pennatula Linnaeus, 1758. Accessed at: https://www.marinespecies.org/copepoda/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=128495 on 2021-05-13
Date
action
by
2004-12-21 15:54:05Z
created
2005-07-27 12:57:38Z
checked
2019-06-25 05:41:35Z
changed

original description Linnaeus, C. (1758). Systema Naturae per regna tria naturae, secundum classes, ordines, genera, species, cum characteribus, differentiis, synonymis, locis. <em>Editio decima, reformata [10th revised edition], vol. 1: 824 pp. Laurentius Salvius: Holmiae.</em> , available online at https://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/726886 [details]  Available for editors  PDF available 

basis of record Williams, G.C.; van der Land, J. (2001). Octocorallia - Pennatulacea. <em>in: Costello, M.J. et al. (Ed.) (2001). European register of marine species: a check-list of the marine species in Europe and a bibliography of guides to their identification.</em> Collection Patrimoines Naturels 50: pp. 105-106. (look up in IMIS[details]   

additional source Williams, G. Pennatulacea checklist for ERMS2.  [details]   

additional source Williams, G.C. (1999). Index Pennatulacea: annotated bibliography and indexes of the Sea Pens (Coelenterata: Octocorallia) of the World 1469-1999. <em>Proc. Calif. Acad. Sci.</em> 51(2): 19-103, 1 fig., 14 plates. (look up in IMIS[details]   

additional source Oken, L. (1815-1816). <em>Lehrbuch der Naturgeschichte. Dritter Theil: Zoologie. Erste Abtheilung: Fleischlose Thiere.</em> Leipzig: C.H. Reclam & Jena: A. Schmid. xxviii + 842 pp. + xviii, 40 pls., available online at http://books.google.com/books?id=Spo5AAAAcAAJ [details]  OpenAccess publication 

additional source Cairns, S.D.; Gershwin, L.; Brook, F.J.; Pugh, P.; Dawson, E.W.; Ocaña O.V.; Vervoort, W.; Williams, G.; Watson, J.E.; Opresko, D.M.; Schuchert, P.; Hine, P.M.; Gordon, D.P.; Campbell, H.J.; Wright, A.J.; Sánchez, J.A.; Fautin, D.G. (2009). Phylum Cnidaria: corals, medusae, hydroids, myxozoans. <em>in: Gordon, D.P. (Ed.) (2009). New Zealand inventory of biodiversity: 1. Kingdom Animalia: Radiata, Lophotrochozoa, Deuterostomia.</em> pp. 59-101., available online at https://repository.si.edu/handle/10088/8431 [details]  Available for editors  PDF available 

additional source Hickson, S.J. (1916). The Pennatulacea of the Siboga Expedition with a general survey of the order. <em>Siboga Expeditie.</em> 14: 1-265, plates 1-10., available online at https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.31822010548360&view=1up&seq=7
page(s): 181-198 [details]   

additional source Hayward, P.J.; Ryland, J.S. (Ed.). (1990). The marine fauna of the British Isles and North-West Europe: 1. Introduction and protozoans to arthropods. Clarendon Press: Oxford, UK. ISBN 0-19-857356-1. 627 pp. (look up in IMIS[details]   
 
 Present  Inaccurate  Introduced: alien  Containing type locality 
From editor or global species database
Homonymy Linnaeus's Pennatula 1758 is a good name for the cnidarians, as this was used first. This homonym of the copepods was created when they were tacked on just because they kind of looked like the cnidarians. Linnaeus did not have a clue. This name is enshrined in the coelenterate order Pennatulacea, where the genus is still found, unburdened by parasitic copepods.

The first of these Linnaean copepod species was Pennatula filosa, taken from the Mediterranean swordfish. The second was Pennatula sagitta, found on the sargassum fish. Subsequent investigators mentioned that Linnaeus’s host notations were about the only useful characteristics he provided (Stebbing 1905). Since Linnaeus’s time, other features have been defined, and both species are valid. Oken (1815), without knowing their true nature, but seeing that these parasites were not as “other” coral-like polyps, proposed the appropriate name Pennella, the “little feather,” for the copepods. Linnaeus’s species names are retained, so that the two species are now Pennella sagitta (Linnaeus, 1758), the type species of Oken's genus, and Pennella filosa (Linnaeus, 1758), both now in the siphonostome family Pennellidae (see Kabata 1979). [details]
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Japanese ウミエラ[フトウミエラ]属  [details]