WoRMS taxon details

Moerisia lyonsi Boulenger, 1908

117762  (urn:lsid:marinespecies.org:taxname:117762)

accepted
Species
marine, brackish
recent only
Boulenger, C.L., 1908. On Moerisia lyonsi, a new hydromedusan from Lake Qurun. Q. Jl microsc. Sci., n. ser. 52 : 357-378, pls 22-23.
page(s): 357 [details]  OpenAccess publication 
Schuchert, P. (2022). World Hydrozoa Database. Moerisia lyonsi Boulenger, 1908. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at: https://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=117762 on 2022-05-24
Date
action
by
2004-12-21 15:54:05Z
created
2013-03-19 07:07:03Z
changed

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original description Boulenger, C.L., 1908. On Moerisia lyonsi, a new hydromedusan from Lake Qurun. Q. Jl microsc. Sci., n. ser. 52 : 357-378, pls 22-23.
page(s): 357 [details]  OpenAccess publication 

context source (Introduced species) Fofonoff, P.W.; Ruiz, G.M.; Steves, B.; Carlton, J.T. (2014). National Exotic Marine and Estuarine Species Information System (NEMESIS), available online at http://invasions.si.edu/nemesis [details]   

basis of record van der Land, J.; Vervoort, W.; Cairns, S.D.; Schuchert, P. (2001). Hydrozoa, <B><I>in</I></B>: Costello, M.J. <i>et al.</i> (Ed.) (2001). <i>European register of marine species: a check-list of the marine species in Europe and a bibliography of guides to their identification. Collection Patrimoines Naturels,</i> 50: pp. 112-120 (look up in IMIS[details]   
 
 Present  Inaccurate  Introduced: alien  Containing type locality 
    Definitions

From regional or thematic species database
Introduced species impact in United States (Nation) : Consumes native species (predator or herbivore) [details]

Introduced species remark United States part of the North Pacific Ocean (Marine Region) Overall, abundance and distribution of medusae of these three hydrozoans in Suisun Marsh depended on seasonal stability of environmental conditions that favored blooms. While harmful effects have yet to be demonstrated, they could become more of a problem as both sea level and water temperatures rise, especially given the combined range of environmental conditions at which the three species occur. [details]