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Polychaeta name details

Eunice megalodus Grube, 1878

327734  (urn:lsid:marinespecies.org:taxname:327734)

 unaccepted (superseded original combination)
Species
marine, brackish, fresh, terrestrial
recent only
Grube, Adolph-Eduard. (1878). Annulata Semperiana. Beiträge zur Kenntniss der Annelidenfauna der Philippinen nach den von Herrn Prof. Semper mitgebrachten Sammlungen. <em>Mémoires l'Académie Impériale des Sciences de St.- Pétersbourg.</em> (série 7) 25(8): 1-300., available online at https://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/45379218
page(s): 156 [details]   
Type locality contained in Philippines  
type locality contained in Philippines [details]
Note Philippine Islands  
Type locality Philippine Islands [details]
Etymology Not stated. The word 'megalodus' is not a Latin dictionary word, but clearly the first part is from Greek 'mega' meaning...  
Etymology Not stated. The word 'megalodus' is not a Latin dictionary word, but clearly the first part is from Greek 'mega' meaning large. In the contexts in which it has been used elsewhere (a fossil bivalve genus Megalodus, and an extinct species of rhino, Aceratherium megalodus Cope, 1930 (now in Aphelops), the second part may be derived from Greek 'odous', a tooth, thus 'large toothed' when converted to Latin, and consistent with Grube's comments about the jaw apparatus. There is also the fossil shark genus with very large teeth, Megalodon. It is difficult to see 'megalodus' as anything other than an declinable adjective, and thus when combined with feminine Eunice, the species-group name should have been 'megaloda'. It is puzzling that Grube used a masculine suffix as he must have been well aware the genus name was feminine. [details]
Read, G.; Fauchald, K. (Ed.) (2018). World Polychaeta database. Eunice megalodus Grube, 1878. Accessed at: http://marinespecies.org/polychaeta/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=327734 on 2020-04-03
Date
action
by
2008-03-17 10:44:16Z
created
2008-03-26 11:36:43Z
changed
2018-10-20 23:05:33Z
changed

original description Grube, Adolph-Eduard. (1878). Annulata Semperiana. Beiträge zur Kenntniss der Annelidenfauna der Philippinen nach den von Herrn Prof. Semper mitgebrachten Sammlungen. <em>Mémoires l'Académie Impériale des Sciences de St.- Pétersbourg.</em> (série 7) 25(8): 1-300., available online at https://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/45379218
page(s): 156 [details]   

taxonomy source Fauchald, K. (1992). A review of the genus <i>Eunice</i> (Eunicidae: Polychaeta) based upon type material. <em>Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology.</em> 523: 1-422., available online at http://dx.doi.org/10.5479/si.00810282.523
page(s): 217; note: Fauchald (1992: 217) stated the features of E. megalodus are those found in genus Euniphysa. Lu & Fauchald (2000) claim that Fauchald (1992) recombined Eunice megalodus into Euniphysa but this is not ...  
Fauchald (1992: 217) stated the features of E. megalodus are those found in genus Euniphysa. Lu & Fauchald (2000) claim that Fauchald (1992) recombined Eunice megalodus into Euniphysa but this is not correct. At best the likely transfer was indirectly implied. Only the name Eunice megalodus was used in the text.
 [details]   

new combination reference Lu, Hua; Fauchald, Kristian. (2000). A phylogenetic and biogeographic study of <i>Euniphysa</i> (Eunicidae, Polychaeta). <em>Journal of Natural History.</em> 34(7): 997-1044., available online at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00222930050020113
page(s): 1031; note: to Euniphysa megalodus, but as an indeterminable species as the specimen is lost [details]  Available for editors  PDF available [request] 
 
 Present  Inaccurate  Introduced: alien  Containing type locality 
 

From editor or global species database
Etymology Not stated. The word 'megalodus' is not a Latin dictionary word, but clearly the first part is from Greek 'mega' meaning large. In the contexts in which it has been used elsewhere (a fossil bivalve genus Megalodus, and an extinct species of rhino, Aceratherium megalodus Cope, 1930 (now in Aphelops), the second part may be derived from Greek 'odous', a tooth, thus 'large toothed' when converted to Latin, and consistent with Grube's comments about the jaw apparatus. There is also the fossil shark genus with very large teeth, Megalodon. It is difficult to see 'megalodus' as anything other than an declinable adjective, and thus when combined with feminine Eunice, the species-group name should have been 'megaloda'. It is puzzling that Grube used a masculine suffix as he must have been well aware the genus name was feminine. [details]

New combination Fauchald (1992: 217) stated the features of E. megalodus are those found in genus Euniphysa. Lu & Fauchald (2000) claim that Fauchald (1992) recombined Eunice megalodus into Euniphysa, but this is not correct. At best the likely transfer was indirectly implied. Only the original-combination name Eunice megalodus was used in the 1992 text. Lu & Fauchald (2000) were the first to create the new combination in Euniphysa [details]

From other sources
Type locality Philippine Islands [details]