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Lucinidae of the Philippines: highest known diversity and ubiquity of chemosymbiotic bivalves from intertidal to bathyal depths (Mollusca: Bivalvia)
Glover, E.A.; Taylor, J.D. (2016). Lucinidae of the Philippines: highest known diversity and ubiquity of chemosymbiotic bivalves from intertidal to bathyal depths (Mollusca: Bivalvia), in: Héros, V. et al. (Ed.) Tropical Deep-Sea Benthos 29. Mémoires du Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle (1993), 208: pp. 65-234
In: Héros, V. et al. (Ed.) (2016). Tropical Deep-Sea Benthos 29. Mémoires du Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle (1993), 208. Publications Scientifiques du Muséum: Paris. ISBN 978-2-85653-774-9. 463 + cd-rom pp.
In: Mémoires du Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle (1993). Éditions du Muséum: Paris. ISSN 1243-4442; e-ISSN 1768-305X
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Keywords
    Biodiversity
    Classification > Taxonomy
    Taxa > New taxa > New genera
    Taxa > Species > New taxa > New species
    Lucinidae J. Fleming, 1828 [WoRMS]
    ISEW, Philippines [Marine Regions]
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Glover, E.A.
  • Taylor, J.D.

Abstract
    From the Philippines at the centre of Indo-West Pacific marine diversity we record 78 species and 42 genera from 7 subfamilies of the chemosymbiotic bivalve family Lucinidae. Sixty species were identified from over 16,000 lucinid specimens collected in the central Philippines from the PANGLAO 2004 Biodiversity Project and the PANGLAO 2005 Deep-Sea Cruise. Other species were identified from samples collected by other expeditions to the area (ESTASE 2, MUSORSTOM 2 & 3 and AURORA 2007) and from existing museum collections. Twenty-six new species and three new genera, Opalocina, Easmithia and Jallenia are described. Notable are the five species of Myrtina, and seven Notomyrtea recognised and Pseudolucinisca recorded for the first time outside of South and Western Australia. Species range in size from 1.5 to 87 mm, with 37 species smaller than 15 mm and 11 less than 5 mm, including some of the most abundant. Lucinidae have a wide habitat distribution and a total bathymetric range from the intertidal to 2570 m with up to 27 species occurring between 100-300 m. Deeper water assemblages, dominated by species of Leucosphaerinae, Myrteinae and Cardiolucina, begin at depths of ca. 100 m with a turnover of species to 1000 m with 3 species recorded from 2570 m. Protoconchs of 53 species were examined and these demonstrate different strategies of larval development. Deeper water species of Leucosphaerinae, Myrteinae and Cardiolucina tend to have large P1 with a very narrow PII stage indicating a short non-feeding pre-settlement stage while many shallow water species in the Lucininae have larger PII stages, often with many growth increments, indicating a longer, feeding planktonic stage. Microsculpture characters at magnifications to 2000x, examined for the first time, indicate a strong taxonomic signal with Myrteinae possessing mesh-like pitted structures and Codakiinae linear pitting, while Leucosphaerinae lack these structures. The Philippine lucinid fauna is by far the most diverse yet recorded demonstrating that chemosymbiosis is a common and widespread nutritional strategy and not confined to extreme or unusual habitats.

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