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Echinoidea taxon details

Cunidentechinus Smith, 2016 †

1339315  (urn:lsid:marinespecies.org:taxname:1339315)

accepted
Genus
marine, brackish, fresh, terrestrial
fossil only
masculine
Smith, A.B. (2016). British Jurassic Regular Echinoids. <em>Monograph of the Palaeontographical Society.</em> 170 (646): 69-176, pls 42-82.
page(s): 69 [details]   
Type locality contained in England  
type locality contained in England [details]
Etymology From the Latin cune for wedge-shaped and dens for tooth, in reference to its distinctive tooth structure.  
Etymology From the Latin cune for wedge-shaped and dens for tooth, in reference to its distinctive tooth structure. [details]

Fossil range Lower Jurassic (Sinemurian to Pliensbachian)  
Fossil range Lower Jurassic (Sinemurian to Pliensbachian) [details]
Kroh, A.; Mooi, R. (2019). World Echinoidea Database. Cunidentechinus Smith, 2016 †. Accessed at: http://www.marinespecies.org/echinoidea/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=1339315 on 2019-06-20
Date
action
by
2019-04-09 06:17:55Z
created

original description Smith, A.B. (2016). British Jurassic Regular Echinoids. <em>Monograph of the Palaeontographical Society.</em> 170 (646): 69-176, pls 42-82.
page(s): 69 [details]   
 
 Present  Inaccurate  Introduced: alien  Containing type locality 
 

From editor or global species database
Diagnosis Small, regular echinoid with a large apical disc whose plates are not firmly bound to the corona. Ambulacral plating simple and uniform, with every third element bearing a primary tubercle; pore-pairs small and uniserially aligned. Interambulacral plates bear a single large primary tubercle with a small, perforated mamelon and strongly crenulated platform. Teeth trapezoidal in cross-section, incorporating large triangular secondary plates. Spines simple, needle-like and much longer than the diameter of the test. [details]

Etymology From the Latin cune for wedge-shaped and dens for tooth, in reference to its distinctive tooth structure. [details]

Fossil range Lower Jurassic (Sinemurian to Pliensbachian) [details]
 




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