Copepoda source details

Zenetos, A.; Gofas, S.; Verlaque, M.; Cinar, M.; Garcia Raso, J.; Bianchi, C.; Morri, C.; Azzurro, E.; Bilecenoglu, M.; Froglia, C.; Siokou, I.; Violanti, D.; Sfriso, A.; San Martin, G.; Giangrande, A.; Katagan, T.; Ballesteros, E.; Ramos-Espla, A.; Mastrototaro, F.; Ocana, O.; Zingone, A.; Gambi, M.; Streftaris, N. (2010). Alien species in the Mediterranean Sea by 2010. A contribution to the application of European Union’s Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD). Part I. Spatial distribution. Mediterranean Marine Science. 11(2): 381-493.
155063
10.12681/mms.87 [view]
Zenetos, A.; Gofas, S.; Verlaque, M.; Cinar, M.; Garcia Raso, J.; Bianchi, C.; Morri, C.; Azzurro, E.; Bilecenoglu, M.; Froglia, C.; Siokou, I.; Violanti, D.; Sfriso, A.; San Martin, G.; Giangrande, A.; Katagan, T.; Ballesteros, E.; Ramos-Espla, A.; Mastrototaro, F.; Ocana, O.; Zingone, A.; Gambi, M.; Streftaris, N.
2010
Alien species in the Mediterranean Sea by 2010. A contribution to the application of European Union’s Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD). Part I. Spatial distribution
Mediterranean Marine Science
11(2): 381-493
Publication
Available for editors  PDF available
The state-of-art on alien species in the Mediterranean Sea is presented, making distinctions among the four subregions defined in the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive: (i) the Western Mediterranean Sea (WMED); (ii) the Central Mediterranean Sea (CMED); (iii) the Adriatic Sea (ADRIA); and (iv) the Eastern Mediterranean Sea (EMED). The updated checklist (December 2010) of marine alien species within each subregion, along with their acclimatization status and origin, is provided. A total of 955 alien species is known in the Mediterranean, the vast majority of them having being introduced in the EMED (718), less in the WMED (328) and CMED (267) and least in the Adriatic (171). Of these, 535 species (56%) are established in at least one area. Despite the collective effort of experts who attempted in this work, the number of introduced species remains probably underestimated. Excluding microalgae, for which knowledge is still insufficient, aliens have increased the total species richness of the Mediterranean Sea by 5.9%. This figure should not be directly read as an indication of higher biodiversity, as spreading of so many aliens within the basin is possibly causing biotic homogenization. Thermophilic species, i.e. Indo-Pacific, Indian Ocean, Red Sea, Tropical Atlantic, Tropical Pacific, and circum(sub)tropical, account for 88.4% of the introduced species in the EMED, 72.8% in the CMED, 59.3% in the WMED and 56.1% in the Adriatic. Cold water species, i.e. circumboreal, N Atlantic, and N Pacific, make up a small percentage of the introduced species, ranging between 4.2% and 21.6% and being more numerous in the Adriatic and less so in the EMED. Species that are classified as invasive or potentially invasive are 134 in the whole of the Mediterranean: 108 are present in the EMED, 75 in the CMED, 53 in the Adriatic and 64 in the WMED. The WMED hosts most invasive macrophytes, whereas the EMED has the lion’s share in polychaetes, crustaceans, molluscs and fish.
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2013-01-12 18:30:12Z
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Acartia (Acanthacartia) fossae Gurney, 1927 (additional source)
Acartia (Acanthacartia) tonsa Dana, 1849 (additional source)
Acartia (Odontacartia) centrura Giesbrecht, 1889 (additional source)
Arietellus pavoninus Sars G.O., 1905 (additional source)
Calanopia biloba Bowman, 1957 (additional source)
Calanopia elliptica (Dana, 1849) (additional source)
Calanopia media Gurney, 1927 (additional source)
Calanopia minor Scott A., 1902 (additional source)
Canuellina insignis Gurney, 1927 (additional source)
Centropages furcatus (Dana, 1849) (additional source)
Clavellisa ilishae Pillai, 1962 (additional source)
Enhydrosoma vicinum Por, 1967 (additional source)
Euchaeta concinna Dana, 1849 (additional source)
Labidocera agilis (Dana, 1849) accepted as Labidocera acutifrons (Dana, 1849) (additional source)
Labidocera detruncata (Dana, 1849) (additional source)
Labidocera madurae Scott A., 1909 (additional source)
Labidocera orsinii Giesbrecht, 1889 (additional source)
Labidocera pavo Giesbrecht, 1889 (additional source)
Metacalanus acutioperculum Ohtsuka, 1984 (additional source)
Mitrapus oblongus (Pillai, 1964) (additional source)
Myicola ostreae Hoshina & Sugiura, 1953 (additional source)
Mytilicola orientalis Mori, 1935 (additional source)
Nothobomolochus fradei Marquès, 1965 (additional source)
Paracalanus indicus Wolfenden, 1905 (additional source)
Paracartia grani Sars G.O., 1904 (additional source)
Parvocalanus crassirostris (Dahl F., 1894) (additional source)
Parvocalanus elegans Andronov, 1972 (additional source)
Parvocalanus latus Andronov, 1972 (additional source)
Pseudocalanus elongatus (Boeck, 1865) (additional source)
Pseudocyclops xiphophorus Wells, 1967 (additional source)
Robertsonia salsa Gurney, 1927 (additional source)
Scaphocalanus amplius Park, 1970 (additional source)
Scaphocalanus brevirostris Park, 1970 (additional source)
Scolecithrix valens Farran, 1926 accepted as Scolecithricella valens (Farran, 1926) accepted as Amallothrix valens (Farran, 1926) (additional source)
Scottolana longipes (Thompson I.C. & Scott A., 1903) (additional source)
Spinocalanus terranovae Damkaer, 1975 (additional source)
Stenhelia (Delavalia) minuta (Scott A., 1902) accepted as Delavalia minuta Scott A., 1902 (additional source)
Stenhelia inopinata (Scott A., 1902) accepted as Delavalia inopinata Scott A., 1902 (additional source)
Subeucalanus subcrassus (Giesbrecht, 1888) (additional source)
Triconia hawii (Böttger-Schnack & Boxshall, 1990) (additional source)
Triconia rufa (Boxshall & Böttger, 1987) (additional source)
Triconia umerus (Böttger-Schnack & Boxshall, 1990) (additional source)