WoRMS name details

Checked: verified by a taxonomic editorEupomatus floridanus Bush, 1910

337982  (urn:lsid:marinespecies.org:taxname:337982)

Unaccepted: synonym, or anything that is not accepted unaccepted (superseded original combination)
Species
marine, brackish, fresh, terrestrial
recent only
Bush, Katharine J. (1910). Description of new serpulids from Bermuda with notes on known forms from adjacent regions. Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia. 62: 490-501, plate 36 (separate from text)., available online at http://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/26294605 [details]  OpenAccess publication 
Checked: verified by a taxonomic editorDistribution South Florida  
Checked: verified by a taxonomic editortype locality contained in South Florida [details]
Checked: verified by a taxonomic editorNote Read et al (2016: 18) "Unknown, not certain to...  
From editor or global species database
Checked: verified by a taxonomic editorType locality Read et al (2016: 18) "Unknown, not certain to be off namesake Florida. When Ehlers (1887: 286) described the Polychaeta collected from voyages of Coast Survey Steamer “Blake” he wrote in his native German but recorded the two locations for the Eupomatus specimens literally in English as “inside fishing ground Cape Rear” and also “off W. down Cape Dear Rio” (both at 7 fathoms). However, these place-names seem to be misreadings as they could not be found in the Caribbean or Florida, nor do the “Blake” voyage reports include the names. The similarity of names suggests the location is possibly off Cape Fear, North Carolina, with its associated Cape Fear (Rio) River, disregarding that Ehlers’ monograph title appears to exclude Atlantic coast voyages the “Blake” also made. As the types are believed lost the original label cannot be checked. No specimens are currently listed in the Yale Peabody Museum online catalogue although Bush (1910: 498) earlier saw a mass of several hundred tubes, indicating an aggregation." [details]
Checked: verified by a taxonomic editorEtymology After the locality. Florida is Spanish for...  
Checked: verified by a taxonomic editorEtymology After the locality. Florida is Spanish for flowery land. A better adjectival formation would have been floridensis, but floridanus and floridana are widely used with gender agreement with genus as if adjectival Latin. [details]

Checked: verified by a taxonomic editorTaxonomy new name proposed in text by Bush for...  
Checked: verified by a taxonomic editorTaxonomy new name proposed in text by Bush for Eupomatus uncinatus sensu Ehlers, 1887, an identification as Philippi's E. uncinatus by Ehlers. Bush introduced the name as follows: "Eupomatus Floridanus nom. nov. for E. uncinatus Ehlers, 1887 (non Philippi, 1844), from 7 fathoms off Cape Dear Rio, Florida, has 11 very long, much curved spines with inner basal spinule on upper cup and about 30 deep points on edge of lower one. This does not agree with the operculum of E. uncinatus from the Mediterranean (a. fact mentioned by Ehlers)." [details]
ten Hove, H. (2009). Eupomatus floridanus Bush, 1910. In: Read, G.; Fauchald, K. (Ed.) (2017). World Polychaeta database. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=337982 on 2017-12-14

Date
action
by
2008-03-18 12:55:09Z
created
2008-03-26 11:36:43Z
changed
2009-01-20 20:00:53Z
changed

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original description Bush, Katharine J. (1910). Description of new serpulids from Bermuda with notes on known forms from adjacent regions. Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia. 62: 490-501, plate 36 (separate from text)., available online at http://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/26294605 [details]  OpenAccess publication 

additional source Ehlers, Ernst. (1887). Reports on the results of dredging, under the direction of L. F. Pourtalès, during the years 1868-1870, and of Alexander Agassiz, in the Gulf of Mexico (1877-78), and in the Caribbean Sea (1878-79), in the U.S. Coast Survey steamer "Blake", Lieut-Com. C. D. Sigsbee, U.S.N. and Commander J. R. Bartlett, U.S.N., commanding. XXXI. Report on the Annelids. Memoirs of the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard College. 15: vi & 335 pp., available online at http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/96641#page/7/mode/1up
page(s): 285; note: identified initially as Eupomatus uncinatus [details]   

source of synonymy Hartman, Olga. (1959). Catalogue of the Polychaetous Annelids of the World. Parts 1 and 2. Allan Hancock Foundation Occasional Paper. 23: 1-628. [details]  Available for editors  PDF available [request] 
 
 Present  Inaccurate  Introduced: alien 
 

From editor or global species database
Checked: verified by a taxonomic editorEtymology After the locality. Florida is Spanish for flowery land. A better adjectival formation would have been floridensis, but floridanus and floridana are widely used with gender agreement with genus as if adjectival Latin. [details]

Checked: verified by a taxonomic editorSpecimen Peabody Museum, Yale University? (not currently listed in the YPM online catalogue). Bush (1910) had viewed a mass of two or three hundred tubes in the Museum [details]

Checked: verified by a taxonomic editorSynonymy Eupomatus floridanus Bush, 1910 is senior objective synonym to Hydroides rostrata Iroso, 1921, as both are names proposed for the specimens and description published in an identification by Ehlers, 1887 attributed to E. uncinatus  [details]

Checked: verified by a taxonomic editorTaxonomy new name proposed in text by Bush for Eupomatus uncinatus sensu Ehlers, 1887, an identification as Philippi's E. uncinatus by Ehlers. Bush introduced the name as follows: "Eupomatus Floridanus nom. nov. for E. uncinatus Ehlers, 1887 (non Philippi, 1844), from 7 fathoms off Cape Dear Rio, Florida, has 11 very long, much curved spines with inner basal spinule on upper cup and about 30 deep points on edge of lower one. This does not agree with the operculum of E. uncinatus from the Mediterranean (a. fact mentioned by Ehlers)." [details]

Checked: verified by a taxonomic editorType locality Read et al (2016: 18) "Unknown, not certain to be off namesake Florida. When Ehlers (1887: 286) described the Polychaeta collected from voyages of Coast Survey Steamer “Blake” he wrote in his native German but recorded the two locations for the Eupomatus specimens literally in English as “inside fishing ground Cape Rear” and also “off W. down Cape Dear Rio” (both at 7 fathoms). However, these place-names seem to be misreadings as they could not be found in the Caribbean or Florida, nor do the “Blake” voyage reports include the names. The similarity of names suggests the location is possibly off Cape Fear, North Carolina, with its associated Cape Fear (Rio) River, disregarding that Ehlers’ monograph title appears to exclude Atlantic coast voyages the “Blake” also made. As the types are believed lost the original label cannot be checked. No specimens are currently listed in the Yale Peabody Museum online catalogue although Bush (1910: 498) earlier saw a mass of several hundred tubes, indicating an aggregation." [details]