WoRMS name details

Pomatoceros terraenovae Benham, 1927

331051  (urn:lsid:marinespecies.org:taxname:331051)

 unaccepted (subjective synonym)
Species
marine, brackish, fresh, terrestrial
recent only
Benham, William B. (1927). Polychaeta [Terra Nova]. British Antarctic 'Terra Nova' Expedition Natural History Reports, Zoology. 7(2): 47-182, plates 1-6., available online at http://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/49465872 [details]   
Note Recorded as "South Trinidad", nowadays...  
From editor or global species database
Type locality Recorded as "South Trinidad", nowadays Trindade, in the tropical Atlantic 20 deg S off Brazil, gazetteer geolocation -20.525, -29.325. Benham also recorded tropical Spirobranchus tricornis (=> S. giganteus) from the same S Trinidad sample. Day (1975: 205) reports that Zibrowius suspects that this locality is due lo label error, and that the material originated from Australia. However, this is not possible as no benthic or shore collections are recorded for Melbourne, the only Australian port the Terra Nova visited (Harmer & Lillie, 1914), and Benham lists no Australian locations. Therefore there is no Australian locality material Benham could confuse with elsewhere. Outside of Antarctica, and S. Trinidad, the only shore location of the Terra Nova expeditions was Admiralty Bay, 'Nelson' (actually 50 km north of Nelson), in New Zealand, although Benham recorded several serpulids, including new species, from other New Zealand benthic stations. The type locality of P. terraenovae is either correct as stated by Benham, or indeterminable. It is not in Australia, but speculatively might be in New Zealand.  [details]
Etymology Not stated, but evidently named by Benham after the expedition vessel, Terra Nova, of Scott's Antarctic expedition, 1910  
Etymology Not stated, but evidently named by Benham after the expedition vessel, Terra Nova, of Scott's Antarctic expedition, 1910 [details]
Read, G.; Fauchald, K. (Ed.) (2018). World Polychaeta database. Pomatoceros terraenovae Benham, 1927. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at: http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=331051 on 2018-06-20
Date
action
by
2008-03-17 10:44:16Z
created
2008-03-26 11:36:43Z
changed
2009-09-30 11:46:15Z
changed
2017-11-29 01:37:38Z
changed

Creative Commons License The webpage text is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License


original description Benham, William B. (1927). Polychaeta [Terra Nova]. British Antarctic 'Terra Nova' Expedition Natural History Reports, Zoology. 7(2): 47-182, plates 1-6., available online at http://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/49465872 [details]   

source of synonymy Day, John H. (1975). On a collection of Polychaeta from intertidal and shallow reefs near Perth, Western Australia. Records of the Western Australian Museum. 3(3): 167-208., available online at https://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/52701404
page(s): 205; note: reports an otherwise-unpublished claim from Zibrowius that P. terraenovae Benham was from Australia and is a junior synonym of P. taeniatus Lamarck (now in Spirobranchus) [details]  Available for editors  PDF available [request] 
Syntype NHMUK 1928.2.29.55-58, locality Brazilian Exclusive Economic Zone (Trindade) (South Trinidad Island (= Trinidade), shore, station 36, gazetteer for island -20.525, -29.325) [details]
From editor or global species database
Etymology Not stated, but evidently named by Benham after the expedition vessel, Terra Nova, of Scott's Antarctic expedition, 1910 [details]

Synonymy Day (1975: 205) in remarks on his Australian P. caeruleus record writes that "The only other valid species of Pomatoceros recorded from Australia is P. terraenovae Benham 1927, of which the published type locality is South Trinidad in the tropical Atlantic. Dr Zibrowius in a personal letter informs me that he is strongly of the opinion that the locality labels were confused and that Benham's species is Australian [Editor comment: this is not possible - see type locality note]. This appears very probable for Dew (1959) and Straughan (1967) between them have recorded it from Queensland, Victoria Tasmania and South Australia but there is no [further] record from the Atlantic. Again I am indebted to Dr Zibrowius for the information that P. terraenovae is a synonym of P. taeniatus Lamarck. It differs from P. caeruleus in having a convex instead of a slightly concave opercular plate and Dew (1959, fig. 13B) has illustrated a form of P. taeniatus with a small conical projection on the operculum."  [details]

Syntype BMNH 1928.2.29.55-58 [details]

Type locality Recorded as "South Trinidad", nowadays Trindade, in the tropical Atlantic 20 deg S off Brazil, gazetteer geolocation -20.525, -29.325. Benham also recorded tropical Spirobranchus tricornis (=> S. giganteus) from the same S Trinidad sample. Day (1975: 205) reports that Zibrowius suspects that this locality is due lo label error, and that the material originated from Australia. However, this is not possible as no benthic or shore collections are recorded for Melbourne, the only Australian port the Terra Nova visited (Harmer & Lillie, 1914), and Benham lists no Australian locations. Therefore there is no Australian locality material Benham could confuse with elsewhere. Outside of Antarctica, and S. Trinidad, the only shore location of the Terra Nova expeditions was Admiralty Bay, 'Nelson' (actually 50 km north of Nelson), in New Zealand, although Benham recorded several serpulids, including new species, from other New Zealand benthic stations. The type locality of P. terraenovae is either correct as stated by Benham, or indeterminable. It is not in Australia, but speculatively might be in New Zealand.  [details]