WoRMS name details

Maea mirabilis Johnston, 1865

329118  (urn:lsid:marinespecies.org:taxname:329118)

 unaccepted (superseded original combination)
Species
marine, brackish, fresh, terrestrial
recent only
Johnston, G. (1865). A catalogue of the British non-parasitical worms in the collection of the British Museum. <em>[book].</em> 1-365. British Museum. London. [See also separate entry for Baird supplement]., available online at http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/bibliography/12291 [details]  OpenAccess publication 
Note St Andrews, Scotland for neotype. Originally...  
From editor or global species database
Type locality St Andrews, Scotland for neotype. Originally British Isles, unspecified. Johnston notes "This singular worm was given to me by Dr. Greville, who does not remember the locality in which it was found." Johnston collected at Berwick-upon-Tweed, but Fiege et al (2000: 222) report that Robert K Greville lived in Edinburgh. The original specimen is lost. Fiege et al designated a neotype collected at St Andrews, Scotland, in part because Greville had at times collected at St Andrews. No geolocation is given for the neotype. [details]
Etymology Unstated, but mirabilis is the Latin adjective for wonderful, marvellous, extraordinary, and presumed to be a reference to...  
Etymology Unstated, but mirabilis is the Latin adjective for wonderful, marvellous, extraordinary, and presumed to be a reference to the unique appearance of the worm [details]
Read, G.; Fauchald, K. (Ed.) (2018). World Polychaeta database. Maea mirabilis Johnston, 1865. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at: http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=329118 on 2018-12-18
Date
action
by
2008-03-17 10:44:16Z
created
2008-03-26 11:36:43Z
changed
2010-10-01 07:45:32Z
changed

Creative Commons License The webpage text is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License


original description Johnston, G. (1865). A catalogue of the British non-parasitical worms in the collection of the British Museum. <em>[book].</em> 1-365. British Museum. London. [See also separate entry for Baird supplement]., available online at http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/bibliography/12291 [details]  OpenAccess publication 

taxonomy source Fiege, D.; Licher, F.; Mackie, A.S.Y. (2000). A partial review of the European Magelonidae (Annelida: Polychaeta): <i>Magelona mirabilis</i> redefined and <i>M. johnstoni</i> sp. nov. distinguished. <i>. <em>Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom.</em> 80: 215-234. (look up in IMIS)
page(s): 221; note: redescription and neotype [details]  Available for editors  PDF available [request] 

status source Hartman, Olga. (1959). Catalogue of the Polychaetous Annelids of the World. Parts 1 and 2. <em>Allan Hancock Foundation Occasional Paper.</em> 23: 1-628.
page(s): 392 [details]  Available for editors  PDF available [request] 
Neotype BMNH 1999:2400 from original 1921.5.1.3023-3043, geounit Fife [details]
From editor or global species database
Etymology Unstated, but mirabilis is the Latin adjective for wonderful, marvellous, extraordinary, and presumed to be a reference to the unique appearance of the worm [details]

Neotype BMNH 1999.2400 (could not be found in BMNH data portal), separated from BMNH 1921.5.1.3023-3043, Maea mirabilis, St Andrews, Scotland, no geolocation, but an estimated geolocation is 56.347°, -2.795° [details]

Original description Johnston gives a text description, and cites a plate XXII. However, this plate is not in his book (published posthumously) and Fiege et al (2000: 216), who made enquiries about it, did not find the original at BMNH or the Berwick museum which originally held Johnston's documents [details]

Type locality St Andrews, Scotland for neotype. Originally British Isles, unspecified. Johnston notes "This singular worm was given to me by Dr. Greville, who does not remember the locality in which it was found." Johnston collected at Berwick-upon-Tweed, but Fiege et al (2000: 222) report that Robert K Greville lived in Edinburgh. The original specimen is lost. Fiege et al designated a neotype collected at St Andrews, Scotland, in part because Greville had at times collected at St Andrews. No geolocation is given for the neotype. [details]