WoRMS name details

Hydroides trivesiculosus Straughan, 1967 [original]

328477  (urn:lsid:marinespecies.org:taxname:328477)

 unaccepted (incorrect original spelling for gender agreement)
Species
marine, brackish, fresh, terrestrial
recent only
Straughan, Dale. (1967). Some Serpulidae (Annelida: Polychaeta) from Heron Island, Queensland. University of Queensland Papers [Great Barrier Reef Committee, Heron Island Research Station]. 1(2): 27-45. [details]   
Note Heron Island, Queensland coast, Australia,...  
From editor or global species database
Type locality Heron Island, Queensland coast, Australia, collected close to the marine station by Dew (map in Straughan 1967), map estimate -23.4430°, 151.9110° [details]
Etymology Not stated, but the name for H. trivesiculosus is evidently referring to the three lobes of the enlarged dorsal spine of...  
Etymology Not stated, but the name for H. trivesiculosus is evidently referring to the three lobes of the enlarged dorsal spine of the verticil, thus tri with Latin adjective vesiculosus -a um 'full of blisters'. [details]

Taxonomy Kupriyanova et al (2015:280) Compared to H. albiceps "H. trivesiculosa has an exceptionally large vesicular dorsal verticil...  
Taxonomy Kupriyanova et al (2015:280) Compared to H. albiceps "H. trivesiculosa has an exceptionally large vesicular dorsal verticil spine which is more than 5 times longer than the smaller verticil spines." p.294 "Hydroides trivesiculosa can usually be distinguished from H. albiceps by the exceptionally large size of the dorsal bulbous verticil spine, and the lower number of verticil spines, but there are (few) transitional forms. Additionally, molecular studies are needed to determine whether H. trivesiculosa and H. albiceps are separate species." [details]
Read, G.; Fauchald, K. (Ed.) (2018). World Polychaeta database. Hydroides trivesiculosus Straughan, 1967 [original]. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at: http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=328477 on 2018-05-24
Date
action
by
2008-03-17 10:44:16Z
created
2008-03-26 11:36:43Z
changed
2008-11-04 07:12:01Z
changed
2016-08-03 03:05:14Z
changed

Creative Commons License The webpage text is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License


original description Straughan, Dale. (1967). Some Serpulidae (Annelida: Polychaeta) from Heron Island, Queensland. University of Queensland Papers [Great Barrier Reef Committee, Heron Island Research Station]. 1(2): 27-45. [details]   

taxonomy source Kupriyanova, Elena; Sun, Yanan; ten Hove, Harry A.; Wong, Eunice; Rouse, Greg W. (2015). Serpulidae (Annelida) of Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Zootaxa. 4019(1): 275-353., available online at https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4019.1.13 [details]   

additional source ten Hove, H.A. & Ben-Eliahu, M. Nechama. (2005). On the identity of Hydroides priscus Pillai, 1971 - Taxonomic confusion due to ontogeny in some serpulid genera (Annelida: Polychaeta: Serpulidae). Senckenbergiana biologica. 85(2):127-145. [details]   

additional source Hove, Harry A. ten 1994. Serpulidae (Annelida: Polychaeta) from the Seychelles and Amirante Islands, in J.v.d. Land ed., Oceanic reefs of the Seychelles. Cruise reports Neth. Indian Ocean Programm II: Leiden, Nat. Nat. Mus. Leiden, p. 107-116. [details]   
 
 Present  Inaccurate  Introduced: alien 
 

From editor or global species database
Etymology Not stated, but the name for H. trivesiculosus is evidently referring to the three lobes of the enlarged dorsal spine of the verticil, thus tri with Latin adjective vesiculosus -a um 'full of blisters'. [details]

Taxonomy Kupriyanova et al (2015:280) Compared to H. albiceps "H. trivesiculosa has an exceptionally large vesicular dorsal verticil spine which is more than 5 times longer than the smaller verticil spines." p.294 "Hydroides trivesiculosa can usually be distinguished from H. albiceps by the exceptionally large size of the dorsal bulbous verticil spine, and the lower number of verticil spines, but there are (few) transitional forms. Additionally, molecular studies are needed to determine whether H. trivesiculosa and H. albiceps are separate species." [details]

Type locality Heron Island, Queensland coast, Australia, collected close to the marine station by Dew (map in Straughan 1967), map estimate -23.4430°, 151.9110° [details]