WoRMS taxon details

Checked: verified by a taxonomic editorPteraeolidia ianthina (Angas, 1864)

213527

urn:lsid:marinespecies.org:taxname:213527

accepted
Species
Checked: verified by a taxonomic editorFlabellina ianthina Angas, 1864 (original combination)
marine
(ofChecked: verified by a taxonomic editorFlabellina ianthina Angas, 1864) Angas, G.F. (1864) Description d´espèces nouvelles appartenant à plusiurs genres de Mollusques Nudibranches des environs de Port-Jackson (Nouvelle-Galles du Sud), accompagnée de dessins faits d´après nature. Journal de Conchyliologie, series 3, 12: 43-70., available online at http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/54459#page/51/mode/1up
page(s): 66-67, Plate 6, Figure 6 [details]   
Checked: verified by a taxonomic editorDistribution Sydney  
Checked: verified by a taxonomic editortype locality contained in Sydney [from synonym] [view taxon] [details]
Unreviewed: has not been verified by a taxonomic editorDescription Up to 7 cm . One of the most common aeolids...  
Unreviewed: has not been verified by a taxonomic editorDescription Up to 7 cm . One of the most common aeolids found, this species has many clusters of cerata on each side. Body colour can be pale to dark purple, although brown and green specimens are not uncommon. The fat rhinophores and very long oral tentacles are banded with violet and white. Brown and green pigments are due to the presence of symbiotic zooaxanthellae which continue to photosynthesise. Nematocysts are also present in the tips of the cerata and these, together with the zooaxanthellae, are presumed to be derived from coelenterate prey. Habitat: diverse, among shallow coral reefs. Distribution: Indo-Pacific. N.B. can inflict a painful sting to humans. [details]
Rosenberg, G. (2012). Pteraeolidia ianthina (Angas, 1864). In: MolluscaBase (2017). Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=213527 on 2017-11-21

Date
action
by
1998-09-02 12:07:28Z
created
2000-05-25 20:30:53Z
changed
2012-06-03 01:55:19Z
changed

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original description  (ofChecked: verified by a taxonomic editorFlabellina ianthina Angas, 1864) Angas, G.F. (1864) Description d´espèces nouvelles appartenant à plusiurs genres de Mollusques Nudibranches des environs de Port-Jackson (Nouvelle-Galles du Sud), accompagnée de dessins faits d´après nature. Journal de Conchyliologie, series 3, 12: 43-70., available online at http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/54459#page/51/mode/1up
page(s): 66-67, Plate 6, Figure 6 [details]   

basis of record Wilson N.G. & Burghardt I. (2015). Here be dragons – phylogeography of Pteraeolidia ianthina (Angas, 1864) reveals multiple species of photosynthetic nudibranchs (Aeolidina: Nudibranchia). Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society. 175(1): 119-133., available online at https://doi.org/10.1111/zoj.12266 [details]   

additional source Spencer H.G., Willan R.C., Marshall B.A. & Murray T.J. (2011). Checklist of the Recent Mollusca Recorded from the New Zealand Exclusive Economic Zone. , available online at http://www.molluscs.otago.ac.nz [details]   

additional source Gosliner, T. M. (1980 ["1979"]). The systematics of the Aeolidiacea (Nudibranchia: Mollusca) of the Hawaiian Islands, with descriptions of two new species. Pacific Science. 33(1): 37-77., available online at http://scholarspace.manoa.hawaii.edu/handle/10125/1455 [details]   

additional source Yorifuji M., Takeshima H., Mabuchi K. & Nishida M. (2012) Hidden diversity in a reef-dwelling sea slug, Pteraeolidia ianthina (Nudibranchia, Aeolidina), in the Northwestern Pacific. Zoological Science 29(6): 359-367. , available online at http://www.bioone.org/doi/full/10.2108/zsj.29.359 [details]   
 
 Present  Inaccurate  Introduced: alien 
 

From other sources
Unreviewed: has not been verified by a taxonomic editorDescription Up to 7 cm . One of the most common aeolids found, this species has many clusters of cerata on each side. Body colour can be pale to dark purple, although brown and green specimens are not uncommon. The fat rhinophores and very long oral tentacles are banded with violet and white. Brown and green pigments are due to the presence of symbiotic zooaxanthellae which continue to photosynthesise. Nematocysts are also present in the tips of the cerata and these, together with the zooaxanthellae, are presumed to be derived from coelenterate prey. Habitat: diverse, among shallow coral reefs. Distribution: Indo-Pacific. N.B. can inflict a painful sting to humans. [details]
 

LanguageName 
Japanese Unreviewed: has not been verified by a taxonomic editorムカデミノウミウシ  [details]