WoRMS taxon details

Goniopora stokesi Milne Edwards & Haime, 1851

207219  (urn:lsid:marinespecies.org:taxname:207219)

accepted
Species
marine, brackish, fresh, terrestrial
Milne Edwards H, Haime J (1851) Recherches sur les polypiers. Mémoire 7. Monographie des Poritides. Annales des Sciences Naturelles, Zoologie, Series 3, 16: 21-70. [details]   
Note unrecorded (Veron, 1986).  
From other sources
Type locality unrecorded (Veron, 1986). [details]
Description Mature colonies are columnar. They may be surrounded by small, free living, roughly spherical balls, which grow into larger...  
Description Mature colonies are columnar. They may be surrounded by small, free living, roughly spherical balls, which grow into larger dome shaped colonies. The skeletal balls develop within the living tissue when still attached to the parent, and then detach to grow independently. (The second photo in both the b/w and colour series are polyp balls.) Calices are deep, sometimes 3 or 4 mm deep, and walls are thin and perforated. In free living balls, septal structures are especially thin and loosely packed, though this condition is also reached in rapidly growing parts of attached columns. The columella is very variable, sometimes very small, sometimes half a calice diameter. Septa are perforated and have an uneven appearance. The calices have a more ragged appearance than other Goniopora. Living polyps are about 10 cm long. The species is found mostly in turbid areas, or amongst sandy patches in broken reef areas, from 2 to 10 m deep. (Sheppard, 1998 <308>)

Colonies are free-living or attached, hemispherical or short thick columns. Calices are 3-6 mm in diameter with high walls which have a ragged appearance. Columellae are broad and irregular. Small daughter colonies often occur imbedded in the living tissue or parent colonies. Polyps are of mixed sizes, the larger being very elongate. Colour: uniform brown or green. Abundance: Uncommon usually found free-living, on sandy substrates. (Veron, 1986 <57>)

Easily recognised under water, as the polyps are fully extended during the day. The presence of "polyp balls"--small skeletal spheres which grow attached to the parent colony and then drop off to form independent colonies--also characterise this species. Polyps have large, white oral cones and, with their 24 tentacles extended, colonies have the appearance of a cluster of daisies. Colonies form low mounds. Colour: usually pale greyish-green. Habitat: sheltered, commonly turbid areas. (Richmond, 1997) [details]
Hoeksema, B. W.; Cairns, S. (2018). World List of Scleractinia. Goniopora stokesi Milne Edwards & Haime, 1851. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at: http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=207219 on 2018-11-16
Date
action
by
1997-02-03 14:17:27Z
created
2000-07-18 15:57:33Z
changed
2008-01-16 10:35:54Z
changed
2014-04-15 00:08:53Z
changed

Creative Commons License The webpage text is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License


original description Milne Edwards H, Haime J (1851) Recherches sur les polypiers. Mémoire 7. Monographie des Poritides. Annales des Sciences Naturelles, Zoologie, Series 3, 16: 21-70. [details]   

original description  (ofAlveopora irregularis Crossland, 1952) Crossland C (1952) Madreporaria, Hydrocorallinae, Heliopora and Tubipora. Scientific Report Great Barrier Reef Expedition 1928-29 VI(3): 85-257. [details]   

basis of record Veron, J.E.N. (1986). Corals of Australia and the Indo-Pacific. Angus & Robertson Publishers, London. [details]   

additional source Cairns, S.D.; Hoeksema, B.W. & van der Land, J. (2007). as a contribution to UNESCO-IOC Register of Marine Organisms. (look up in IMIS[details]   

additional source Liu J.Y. [Ruiyu] (ed.). (2008). Checklist of marine biota of China seas. <em>China Science Press.</em> 1267 pp. (look up in IMIS[details]  Available for editors  PDF available [request] 

additional source Veron JEN. (2000). Corals of the World. Vol. 1–3. Australian Institute of Marine Science and CRR, Queensland, Australia.  [details]   

additional source Veron JEN, Pichon M (1982) Scleractinia of Eastern Australia – Part IV. Family Poritidae. Australian Institute of Marine Science Monograph Series 5: 1–159. [details]   
 
 Present  Inaccurate  Introduced: alien  Containing type locality 
 

From editor or global species database
Biology zooxanthellate [details]

From other sources
Description Mature colonies are columnar. They may be surrounded by small, free living, roughly spherical balls, which grow into larger dome shaped colonies. The skeletal balls develop within the living tissue when still attached to the parent, and then detach to grow independently. (The second photo in both the b/w and colour series are polyp balls.) Calices are deep, sometimes 3 or 4 mm deep, and walls are thin and perforated. In free living balls, septal structures are especially thin and loosely packed, though this condition is also reached in rapidly growing parts of attached columns. The columella is very variable, sometimes very small, sometimes half a calice diameter. Septa are perforated and have an uneven appearance. The calices have a more ragged appearance than other Goniopora. Living polyps are about 10 cm long. The species is found mostly in turbid areas, or amongst sandy patches in broken reef areas, from 2 to 10 m deep. (Sheppard, 1998 <308>)

Colonies are free-living or attached, hemispherical or short thick columns. Calices are 3-6 mm in diameter with high walls which have a ragged appearance. Columellae are broad and irregular. Small daughter colonies often occur imbedded in the living tissue or parent colonies. Polyps are of mixed sizes, the larger being very elongate. Colour: uniform brown or green. Abundance: Uncommon usually found free-living, on sandy substrates. (Veron, 1986 <57>)

Easily recognised under water, as the polyps are fully extended during the day. The presence of "polyp balls"--small skeletal spheres which grow attached to the parent colony and then drop off to form independent colonies--also characterise this species. Polyps have large, white oral cones and, with their 24 tentacles extended, colonies have the appearance of a cluster of daisies. Colonies form low mounds. Colour: usually pale greyish-green. Habitat: sheltered, commonly turbid areas. (Richmond, 1997) [details]

Type locality unrecorded (Veron, 1986). [details]
 

LanguageName 
English anemone coral  [details]
Japanese コモチハナガササンゴ  [details]