WoRMS name details

Pectinaria (Lagis) koreni (Malmgren, 1866)

130595  (urn:lsid:marinespecies.org:taxname:130595)

 unaccepted (supersed recombination)
Species

Subspecies Pectinaria (Lagis) koreni cirrata Day, 1963 accepted as Lagis koreni cirrata (Day, 1963) (superseded original combination)
marine, brackish, fresh, terrestrial
recent only
Description Short, thick, tube-living bristle worm up to 50 mm long. The head has a special form and is covered at the top by golden...  
Description Short, thick, tube-living bristle worm up to 50 mm long. The head has a special form and is covered at the top by golden bristles (digging function) and tentacle membranes and is furthermore characterised by two pairs of carmine gills. The tube is constructed of medium-sized sand grains and is buried in the sediment with the worm upside down. [details]

Distribution The species shows clear patches with high densities in the South-eastern part of the Oyster Ground, north of the Dutch...  
Distribution The species shows clear patches with high densities in the South-eastern part of the Oyster Ground, north of the Dutch Wadden islands. Areas with elevated densities are also found in the central part of the Oyster Ground and north-west of the island of Texel. L. koreni is almost absent from the more southern part of the Southern Bight and the northern part of the Oyster Ground. lt is completely missing in the brackish waters, although reports suggest it tolerates low salinities. [details]

Distribution Pectinaria koreni is widely spread in the Belgian part of the North Sea in both periods. A higher frequency of occurrence...  
Distribution Pectinaria koreni is widely spread in the Belgian part of the North Sea in both periods. A higher frequency of occurrence was nevertheless observed in the near-coastal zone, especially in the 1994-2001period. In both periods high densities of P. koreni were observed (1976-1986 period: maximum 1,100 ind./m2; 1994-2001 period: maximum 350 ind./m2). [details]
Read, G.; Fauchald, K. (Ed.) (2018). World Polychaeta database. Pectinaria (Lagis) koreni (Malmgren, 1866). Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at: http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=130595 on 2018-04-21
Date
action
by
2004-12-21 15:54:05Z
created
2008-03-26 11:36:43Z
changed
2010-10-28 07:38:59Z
changed

Creative Commons License The webpage text is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License


basis of record Bellan, Gerard. (2001). Polychaeta, in: Costello, M.J. et al. (Ed.) (2001). European register of marine species: a check-list of the marine species in Europe and a bibliography of guides to their identification. Collection Patrimoines Naturels. 50: pp. 214-231. (look up in IMIS[details]   

additional source Muller, Y. (2004). Faune et flore du littoral du Nord, du Pas-de-Calais et de la Belgique: inventaire. [Coastal fauna and flora of the Nord, Pas-de-Calais and Belgium: inventory]. Commission Régionale de Biologie Région Nord Pas-de-Calais: France. 307 pp., available online at http://www.vliz.be/imisdocs/publications/145561.pdf [details]   

additional source Bobretzky, N. (1881). Dopolnenia k faune Annelid Chernogo morya [Additions/supplement to the annelid fauna of the Black Sea]. Zapiski Kievskago obshchestva estestvoispytateleĭ [Mémoires de la Société des Naturalistes de Kiew]. 6(2): 183-212, plates 6 & 7., available online at https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/100422735
note: usage for Black Sea as [sic] Lagis (Pectinaria) koreni, and description. [combination not possible as Pectinaria is much senior to Lagis, so perhaps a lapsus by Bobretzky)  [details]  OpenAccess publication 

additional source Hartmann-Schröder, G. (1996). Annelida, Borstenwürmer, Polychaeta [Annelida, bristleworms, Polychaeta]. 2nd revised ed. The fauna of Germany and adjacent seas with their characteristics and ecology, 58. Gustav Fischer: Jena, Germany. ISBN 3-437-35038-2. 648 pp. (look up in IMIS[details]  Available for editors  PDF available [request] 

status source Hutchings, Pat and Peart, Rachael 2002. A Review of the Genera of Pectinariidae (Polychaeta) Together with a Description of the Australian Fauna. Records of the Australian Museum, 54: 99-127., available online at http://publications.australianmuseum.net.au/pdf/1356_complete.pdf
page(s): 112 [details]   
 
 Present  Inaccurate  Introduced: alien 
 

From other sources
Biology The sexes are separate and breeding occurs in the period between spring and summer. The species has pelagic larvae. lts life span is thought to be about one year and the animals breed once in a life time. The life cycle strategy shows rapid growth following settlement. These attributes, are commonly associated with species that thrive in unstable environments. L. koreni is a head down deposit feeder, digging with its stout chaetae and sorting with its tentacles.


During this action the tube is diagonally or vertically oriented in the sediment with the tail end projecting from the surface. The subsurface feeding void is in contact with the surface through a small channel, which limits the activity of the worm to the upper 10 cm of the sediment. U-shaped burrows are formed when the animal lives in organic-rich, oxygen-poor, fine sediment. Higher motility is associated with well oxygenated, coarse sediment, relatively poor in organics. The gut contents suggest that the species selectively ingests mi [details]


Description Short, thick, tube-living bristle worm up to 50 mm long. The head has a special form and is covered at the top by golden bristles (digging function) and tentacle membranes and is furthermore characterised by two pairs of carmine gills. The tube is constructed of medium-sized sand grains and is buried in the sediment with the worm upside down. [details]

Distribution The species shows clear patches with high densities in the South-eastern part of the Oyster Ground, north of the Dutch Wadden islands. Areas with elevated densities are also found in the central part of the Oyster Ground and north-west of the island of Texel. L. koreni is almost absent from the more southern part of the Southern Bight and the northern part of the Oyster Ground. lt is completely missing in the brackish waters, although reports suggest it tolerates low salinities. [details]

Distribution Pectinaria koreni is widely spread in the Belgian part of the North Sea in both periods. A higher frequency of occurrence was nevertheless observed in the near-coastal zone, especially in the 1994-2001period. In both periods high densities of P. koreni were observed (1976-1986 period: maximum 1,100 ind./m2; 1994-2001 period: maximum 350 ind./m2). [details]

Habitat Pectinaria koreni displays a clear preference for fine sediments: the finer the sediment, the higher the relative occurrence (maximum > 40%). The species is nevertheless also found in sediments with a median grain size up to 500 μm. Although the species occurs in sediments with strongly varying mud contents, P. koreni is not found in sediments characterised by high mud contents or by absence of mud. [details]

Habitat L. koreni lives in many types of sediment, ranging from silt to coarse sand. It is most abundant in mixed bottoms of fine sand and silt. The species is also found in black anoxic sediments and between oysters or together with the polychaete Sabellaria (Hartmann-Schröder, 1971; Holthe, 1986; lrlinger et al., 1991; Rees & Dare, 1993). [details]

Morphology This species has a short, conical body, tapering towards the tail. The truncated head bears a characteristic row of large golden spines and a tuft of filiform tentacles. The worm is up to 50 mm long and divided into 14 segments. lts characteristic tube is slightly curved and composed of agglutinated fine sand grains. lt is open at both ends. The worm is colourless to pink with red gills (Hartmann-Schröder, 1971; Holthe, 1986; Fish & Fish, 1989; Hayward & Ryland, 1990). [details]
 

LanguageName 
Dutch kamkielwormgoudkammetje  [details]
English trumpet worm  [details]
French queue de pipepectinaire  [details]
German Köcherwurm  [details]