WoRMS taxon details

Eriocheir sinensis H. Milne Edwards, 1853

107451  (urn:lsid:marinespecies.org:taxname:107451)

accepted
Species
marine, brackish, fresh, terrestrial
Milne Edwards, H. (1863). Notes sur quelques Crustacés Nouveaux ou Peu Connus. <em>Archives du Muséum d'Histoire Naturelle.</em> 7: 145-188., available online at https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/164243#page/161/mode/1up
page(s): 146 [details]   
Distribution The species spends most of its time in freshwater, but has to return to the sea for reproduction.  
Distribution The species spends most of its time in freshwater, but has to return to the sea for reproduction. [details]

Distribution Introduced to Europe in 1912 by shipping trade with China. A pest species, causing damage to river banks and fishing nets.  
Distribution Introduced to Europe in 1912 by shipping trade with China. A pest species, causing damage to river banks and fishing nets. [details]
WoRMS (2018). Eriocheir sinensis H. Milne Edwards, 1853. Accessed at: http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=107451 on 2018-10-19
Date
action
by
2004-12-21 15:54:05Z
created
2010-02-25 14:41:38Z
changed
2018-01-29 13:20:14Z
changed

Creative Commons License The webpage text is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License


original description Milne Edwards, H. (1863). Notes sur quelques Crustacés Nouveaux ou Peu Connus. <em>Archives du Muséum d'Histoire Naturelle.</em> 7: 145-188., available online at https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/164243#page/161/mode/1up
page(s): 146 [details]   

context source (Introduced species) Katsanevakis, S.; Bogucarskis, K.; Gatto, F.; Vandekerkhove, J.; Deriu, I.; Cardoso A.S. (2012). Building the European Alien Species Information Network (EASIN): a novel approach for the exploration of distributed alien species data. <em>BioInvasions Records.</em> 1: 235-245., available online at http://easin.jrc.ec.europa.eu [details]  Available for editors  PDF available [request] 

context source (Schelde) Maris, T.; Beauchard, O.; Van Damme, S.; Van den Bergh, E.; Wijnhoven, S.; Meire, P. (2013). Referentiematrices en Ecotoopoppervlaktes Annex bij de Evaluatiemethodiek Schelde-estuarium Studie naar “Ecotoopoppervlaktes en intactness index”. <em>Monitor Taskforce Publication Series, 2013-01. NIOZ: Yerseke.</em> 35 pp. (look up in IMIS[details]   

basis of record Türkay, M. (2001). Decapoda, <B><I>in</I></B>: Costello, M.J. <i>et al.</i> (Ed.) (2001). <i>European register of marine species: a check-list of the marine species in Europe and a bibliography of guides to their identification. Collection Patrimoines Naturels,</i> 50: pp. 284-292 (look up in IMIS[details]   

additional source Muller, Y. (2004). Faune et flore du littoral du Nord, du Pas-de-Calais et de la Belgique: inventaire. [Coastal fauna and flora of the Nord, Pas-de-Calais and Belgium: inventory]. <em>Commission Régionale de Biologie Région Nord Pas-de-Calais: France.</em> 307 pp., available online at http://www.vliz.be/imisdocs/publications/145561.pdf [details]   

additional source Streftaris, N.; Zenetos, A.; Papathanassiou, E. (2005). Globalisation in marine ecosystems: the story of non-indigenous marine species across European seas. <em>Oceanogr. Mar. Biol. Ann. Rev.</em> 43: 419-453. (look up in IMIS[details]  Available for editors  PDF available [request] 

additional source Zenetos, A., M.E. Çinar, M.A. Pancucci-Papadopoulou, J.G. Harmelin, G. Furnari, F. Andaloro, N. Bellou, N. Streftaris & H. Zibrowius. (2005). Annotated list of marine alien species in the Mediterranean with records of the worst invasive species. Mediterranean Marine Science 6(2):63-118. [details]  Available for editors  PDF available [request] 

additional source Felder, D. L., Álvarez. F.,Goy, J.W. & Lemaitre, R. (2009). Decapoda (Crustacea) of the Gulf of Mexico, with comments on the Amphionidacea,. <em>Felder, D.L., and Camp, D.K. (eds), Gulf of Mexico - Origins, Waters, and Biota. Vol. 1. Biodiversity.</em> Pp. 1019–1104 (Texas A&M University Press: College Station, Texas)., available online at http://biogomx.net/sites/default/files/pdfs/chapters/59-Felder%20et%20al%202009-Decapoda%20of%20the%20GoMx.pdf [details]   

additional source Occhipinti-Ambrogi, A.; Marchini, A.; Cantone, G.; Castelli, A.; Chimenz, C.; Cormaci, M.; Froglia, C.; Furnari, G.; Gambi, M. C.; Giaccone, G.; Giangrande, A.; Gravili, C.; Mastrototaro, F.; Mazziotti, C.; Orsi-Relini, L.; Piraino, S. (2010). Alien species along the Italian coasts: an overview. <em>Biological Invasions.</em> 13(1): 215-237., available online at https://doi.org/10.1007/s10530-010-9803-y [details]  Available for editors  PDF available [request] 

additional source Liu J.Y. [Ruiyu] (ed.). (2008). Checklist of marine biota of China seas. <em>China Science Press.</em> 1267 pp. (look up in IMIS[details]  Available for editors  PDF available [request] 

additional source Zenetos, A.; Gofas, S.; Verlaque, M.; Cinar, M.; Garcia Raso, J.; Bianchi, C.; Morri, C.; Azzurro, E.; Bilecenoglu, M.; Froglia, C.; Siokou, I.; Violanti, D.; Sfriso, A.; San Martin, G.; Giangrande, A.; Katagan, T.; Ballesteros, E.; Ramos-Espla, A.; Mastrototaro, F.; Ocana, O.; Zingone, A.; Gambi, M.; Streftaris, N. (2010). Alien species in the Mediterranean Sea by 2010. A contribution to the application of European Union’s Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD). Part I. Spatial distribution. <em>Mediterranean Marine Science.</em> 11(2): 381-493., available online at https://doi.org/10.12681/mms.87 [details]  OpenAccess publication 

additional source Dyntaxa. (2013). Swedish Taxonomic Database. Accessed at www.dyntaxa.se [15-01-2013]., available online at http://www.dyntaxa.se [details]   

additional source Marchini, A.; Ferrario, J.; Sfriso, A.; Occhipinti-Ambrogi, A. (2015). Current status and trends of biological invasions in the Lagoon of Venice, a hotspot of marine NIS introductions in the Mediterranean Sea. <em>Biological Invasions.</em> , available online at https://doi.org/10.1007/s10530-015-0922-3 [details]  Available for editors  PDF available [request] 

additional source Adema, J.P.H.M. (1991). De krabben van Nederland en Belgie (Crustacea, Decapoda, Brachyura) [The crabs of the Netherlands and Belgium (Crustacea, Decapoda, Brachyura)]. <em>Nationaal Natuurhistorisch Museum: Leiden, The Netherlands.</em> ISBN 90-73239-02-8. 244 pp. (look up in IMIS[details]   
 
 Present  Inaccurate  Introduced: alien  Containing type locality 
 

From editor or global species database
Distribution The species spends most of its time in freshwater, but has to return to the sea for reproduction. [details]

From regional or thematic species database
Introduced species abundance in Mediterranean Sea - Western Basin (IHO Sea Area) : It has appeared sporadically in the Mediterranean, Caspian and White Seas. [details]

Introduced species abundance in Canadian part of the Gulf of St-Lawrence (Marine Region) : Common [details]

Introduced species abundance in White Sea (IHO Sea Area) : Crabs of this species are now regularly caught in the Archangel Bay of the White Sea (Berger and Naumov 2002). [details]

Introduced species impact in Canada (Nation) : Other impact - undefined or uncertain [details]

Introduced species impact in United Kingdom part of the Celtic Sea (Marine Region) : Adverse habitat modification [details]

Introduced species impact in Estonia (Nation) : Other impact - undefined or uncertain [details]

Introduced species impact in France (Nation) : Other impact - undefined or uncertain [details]

Introduced species impact in Ukraine (Nation) : Other impact - undefined or uncertain [details]

Introduced species impact in Sweden (Nation) : Other impact - undefined or uncertain [details]

Introduced species impact in France (Nation) : Other impact - undefined or uncertain [details]

Introduced species impact in United Kingdom part of the English Channel (Marine Region) : Adverse habitat modification [details]

Introduced species impact in German part of the Baltic Sea (Marine Region) : Other impact - undefined or uncertain [details]

Introduced species impact in Portugal (Nation) : Loss of aquaculture/commercial/recreational harvest or gain [details]

Introduced species impact in Spain (Nation) : Loss of aquaculture/commercial/recreational harvest or gain [details]

Introduced species impact in Germany (Nation) : Outcompetes native species for resources and/or space [details]

Introduced species impact in Latvia (Nation) : Other impact - undefined or uncertain [details]

Introduced species impact in Sweden (Nation) : Other impact - undefined or uncertain [details]

Introduced species impact in United Kingdom part of the North Sea (Marine Region) : Adverse habitat modification [details]

Introduced species impact in Belgian part of the North Sea : Other impact - undefined or uncertain [details]

Introduced species impact in Germany (Nation) : Other impact - undefined or uncertain [details]

Introduced species population trend in White Sea (IHO Sea Area) : It has appeared sporadically in the Mediterranean, Caspian and White Seas. [details]

Introduced species population trend in Black Sea (IHO Sea Area) : It is established in the Black Sea. [details]

Introduced species remark In United Kingdom part of the North Sea (Marine Region) : Bank erosion [details]

Introduced species remark In United Kingdom part of the Celtic Sea (Marine Region) : Bank erosion [details]

Introduced species remark in Spain (Nation) : Damages and fouls fishing nets and eat fishing baits [details]

Introduced species remark in Canadian part of the Gulf of St-Lawrence (Marine Region) : Listed as "reported" as: "Overall, it is too premature to conclude that the species has established itself in the St. Lawrence ecosystem". [details]

Introduced species remark in Portugal (Nation) : Damages and fouls fishing nets and eat fishing baits [details]

Introduced species remark In United Kingdom part of the English Channel (Marine Region) : Bank erosion [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Ukraine (Nation) : Ships: accidental with ballast water, sea water systems, live wells or other deck basins [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Portugal (Nation) : Ships: accidental with ballast water, sea water systems, live wells or other deck basins [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Switzerland (Nation) : Ships: accidental with ballast water, sea water systems, live wells or other deck basins
Canal systems and ballast water transport have enabled Eriocheir sinensis to reach outlying bodies of water in Eurasia, including rivers and lakes in landlocked countries. [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Sweden (Nation) : Ships: accidental with ballast water, sea water systems, live wells or other deck basins [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Germany (Nation) : Ships: accidental with ballast water, sea water systems, live wells or other deck basins
Likely introduced via ballast water. [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Hungary (Nation) : Ships: accidental with ballast water, sea water systems, live wells or other deck basins
Canal systems and ballast water transport have enabled Eriocheir sinensis to reach outlying bodies of water in Eurasia, including rivers and lakes in landlocked countries. [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Austria (Nation) : Canals: natural range expansion through man-made canals
Canal systems and ballast water transport have enabled Eriocheir sinensis to reach outlying bodies of water in Eurasia, including rivers and lakes in landlocked countries. [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Hungary (Nation) : Canals: natural range expansion through man-made canals
Canal systems and ballast water transport have enabled Eriocheir sinensis to reach outlying bodies of water in Eurasia, including rivers and lakes in landlocked countries. [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Austria (Nation) : Ships: accidental with ballast water, sea water systems, live wells or other deck basins
Canal systems and ballast water transport have enabled Eriocheir sinensis to reach outlying bodies of water in Eurasia, including rivers and lakes in landlocked countries. [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Japan (Nation) : Individual release: deliberate release by individuals
Represent a probable introduction of E. sinensis to Japan from China (Takeda and Koziumi 2005), either by ballast water, or as a fisheries-related release. [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Black Sea (IHO Sea Area) : Canals: natural range expansion through man-made canals
Canals connecting to the Baltic are a likely vector for the Black, White Sea, and Caspian Sea populations [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Switzerland (Nation) : Canals: natural range expansion through man-made canals
Canal systems and ballast water transport have enabled Eriocheir sinensis to reach outlying bodies of water in Eurasia, including rivers and lakes in landlocked countries. [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Czech Republic (Nation) : Canals: natural range expansion through man-made canals
Canal systems and ballast water transport have enabled Eriocheir sinensis to reach outlying bodies of water in Eurasia, including rivers and lakes in landlocked countries. [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in White Sea (IHO Sea Area) : Canals: natural range expansion through man-made canals
Canals connecting to the Baltic are a likely vector for the Black, White Sea, and Caspian Sea populations [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Czech Republic (Nation) : Ships: accidental with ballast water, sea water systems, live wells or other deck basins
Canal systems and ballast water transport have enabled Eriocheir sinensis to reach outlying bodies of water in Eurasia, including rivers and lakes in landlocked countries. [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Canadian part of the Gulf of St-Lawrence (Marine Region) : Ships: accidental with ballast water, sea water systems, live wells or other deck basins [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in French part of the Mediterranean Sea - Western Basin (Marine Region) : Canals: natural range expansion through man-made canals
The crabs had probably reached the Mediterranean by the Canal du Midi.  [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Japan (Nation) : Ships: accidental with ballast water, sea water systems, live wells or other deck basins
Represent a probable introduction of E. sinensis to Japan from China (Takeda and Koziumi 2005), either by ballast water, or as a fisheries-related release. [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Belgian part of the North Sea: Ships: accidental with ballast water, sea water systems, live wells or other deck basins [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Belgian part of the North Sea: Other [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in United Kingdom part of the Celtic Sea (Marine Region) : Ships: general [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Germany (Nation) : Shipping [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in United Kingdom part of the English Channel (Marine Region) : Ships: general [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Sweden (Nation) : Ships: accidental with ballast water, sea water systems, live wells or other deck basins [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in United Kingdom part of the North Sea (Marine Region) : Ships: general [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Belgian part of the North Sea: Ships: accidental as attached or free-living fouling organisms [details]

From other sources
Alien species The Chinese mitten crab already appears in Belgium from 1933. The crab originates from the Far East and was presumably brought to Europe as a larva in the ballast water of ships. From Germany, the species spread through Northern- and Western-Europe. The Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis predominantly lives in rivers, but migrates seaward in the late summer to breed in the brackish part of the estuaries. The egg-carrying females spend the winter at sea, and return to the brackish part of the estuary in spring to release the larvae in the water which then develop to juvenile crabs. These juveniles migrate back up the rivers, streams and canals to complete the life cycle. [details]

Distribution Introduced to Europe in 1912 by shipping trade with China. A pest species, causing damage to river banks and fishing nets. [details]
 

LanguageName 
Danish uldhåndskrabbekinesiske uldhandskrabbe  [details]
Dutch wolpootkrabwolhandkrabChinese wolhandkrabChinese kreeftChinese krab  [details]
English Shanghai hairy crabChinese mitten crabChinese freshwater edible crab  [details]
Finnish villasaksirapu  [details]
French crabe poilu de Shangaicrabe chinois à mitainescrabe chinois  [details]
German WollhandkrabbeChinesische Wollhandkrabbe  [details]
Japanese チュウゴクモクズガニ  [details]
Norwegian Bokmål kinaullhåndskrabbe  [details]
Norwegian Nynorsk kinaullhandskrabbe  [details]
Polish krab wełnistoszczypcy  [details]
Swedish kinesisk ullhandskrabba  [details]